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I had asked in a previous question how to translate, "Take the fork into the kit

French translation: Emporter

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08:32 Aug 28, 2000
English to French translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: I had asked in a previous question how to translate, "Take the fork into the kit
chen" I received 3 different answers and am still confused. Is it "Emmene la forchette dans la cuisine (a la cuisine)", "Emporte... or "Prend...? I believe "Prendre" is incorrect since it means more on the lines of "to get or to fetch" But you do say in French "Prend ca avec toi" or "Emporte ca avec toi" It's just total confusion of "emmener, emporter" (to take), "Amener, apporter"(to bring) and to top it all off, "prendre"(to take, get or fetch. Also, don't forget "Porter"(to carry on oneself). So, if I say "take this chair to you sister's" would it be "Emporte cette chaise chez ta soeur", "Emmene..., "Prend..., or Porte...???? This is one of the most confusing things to me in the French language, but yet it seems so elementary. I just cannot master it.
Stefanie
French translation:Emporter
Explanation:
Emporter signifie : porter ailleurs avec soi et se dit de corps inanimés.
Par image, emporter s'emploie en parlant de personnes enlevées contre leur gré.

Emmener signifie : mener ailleurs avec soi et se dit des êtres vivants.

Ammener signifie : conduire et se dit plutôt des êtres animés, rarement des objets.

Apporter se dit des choses inanimées.

P.S. Prendre in your example would only mean to pick up the fork. You would have to say : Prends la fourchette et emporte-là dans la cuisine.

Hope it helps. The Encyclopedie du bon francais dans l'usage contemporain (Difficultés-Subtilités-Complexités-Singularités) in 3 volumes is one of the best resource for the French language.
Selected response from:

kecikyle
Canada
Local time: 18:28
Grading comment
Thanks again. You were the only who really gave me a comprehensible and accurate response. I knew it was most likely between "emmener" and "emporter" since I speak French fluently. In conversational French (in France), they use "emporter" and "emmener" interchangeably; although "emmener" is supposed to be used for "les etres animes" and "emporter" for "les choses inanimees." I am glad I got this rather simple, but yet very complex question cleared up. Bye now.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naemporte la fourchette dans la cuisine
Carla Sherman
naDifferent meanings depending on action and placeMary Vernet
naEmporter
kecikyle
naThere are all kinds of confusion surrounding these terms--it has to do with sloppy lang. usage!
Yolanda Broad
naPorte la fourchette dans la cuisine.Maria Rusu


  

Answers


22 mins
Porte la fourchette dans la cuisine.


Explanation:
Le Petit Robert

porter = prendre pour emporter, déposer.
ex. Porter ses bagages à la consigne.
Va lui porter ce paquet.

emmener = Le Petit Robert - Mener avec soi (qqn, un animal) en allant d'un lieu dans un autre; prendre avec soi en partant; accompagner qqn; transporter au loin(l'avion qui emmène les voyageurs)
= Hanse - On emmène une personne ou un animal, on emporte une chose ou une personne non valide.

emporter = Le Petit Robert - prendre avec soi et porter hors d'un lieu - Les secouristes emportent les blessés.

Maria Rusu
Canada
Local time: 18:28
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in pair: 23
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51 mins
There are all kinds of confusion surrounding these terms--it has to do with sloppy lang. usage!


Explanation:
English has similarly confusing words: bring vs take, and native speakers are always confusing the two, to the great distress of those who are aware of the differences, and wish to express themselves precisely. In the **transitive** form (bring a book, take a book), you can **correctly** only say "bring from" and "take to".

Similarly, in French, where those prepositions (to, from) take the form of prefixes (a-, em/en-), choice is based on the **direction** in which you are taking the thing or person.

Use the prefix a- for **towards** motion

Use the prefix em/en- for **away from** motion.

Now, the second point:

porter vs mener.

Porter is used for objects that can be lifted and carried. We have terms in English which take this distinction into account, such as *porter*

Mener is used for people (and animals) that are **led*. An easy way to remember this distinction is to look at the etymology (root) for *mener/amener/emmener: la main. That is, it is used for leading by the hand.

Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 18:28
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 720
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10 hrs
Emporter


Explanation:
Emporter signifie : porter ailleurs avec soi et se dit de corps inanimés.
Par image, emporter s'emploie en parlant de personnes enlevées contre leur gré.

Emmener signifie : mener ailleurs avec soi et se dit des êtres vivants.

Ammener signifie : conduire et se dit plutôt des êtres animés, rarement des objets.

Apporter se dit des choses inanimées.

P.S. Prendre in your example would only mean to pick up the fork. You would have to say : Prends la fourchette et emporte-là dans la cuisine.

Hope it helps. The Encyclopedie du bon francais dans l'usage contemporain (Difficultés-Subtilités-Complexités-Singularités) in 3 volumes is one of the best resource for the French language.

kecikyle
Canada
Local time: 18:28
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 28
Grading comment
Thanks again. You were the only who really gave me a comprehensible and accurate response. I knew it was most likely between "emmener" and "emporter" since I speak French fluently. In conversational French (in France), they use "emporter" and "emmener" interchangeably; although "emmener" is supposed to be used for "les etres animes" and "emporter" for "les choses inanimees." I am glad I got this rather simple, but yet very complex question cleared up. Bye now.
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16 hrs
Different meanings depending on action and place


Explanation:
amener : to bring or take FROM outside to inside (where you are), generally concerns people
emmener : to bring or take from inside (where you are) TO outside
apporter : to bring. Means to bring something AT a place
rapporter : to bring BACK something FROM somewhere
prendre : to take (in English "to take" has a different meaning when used with "to", "into", etc...)
TAKE the fork INTO the kitchen = "Rapporte la fourchette dans la cuisine"
TAKE this chair TO your sister's = Emmène cette chaise chez ta soeur
I hope this is helpful !
Good luck with French !
Mary

Mary Vernet
Local time: 00:28
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13 days
emporte la fourchette dans la cuisine


Explanation:
I haven't followed the discussion about this. But I can tell you this for sure:
One uses the verb "emmener" (to take) for animated beings, when they take them to another place. "emporter" (to take) has the same meaning, but is used with inanimated beings. They both mean "to take from the place where the speaker is to another place". If somebody is bringing something to the speaker, one uses "amener" (to bring).


    Personal experience
Carla Sherman
United States
Local time: 15:28
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 8
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