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scots' rock

Gaelic translation: carraig, creag, sgòrrbheann; cuigeal; tèarmunn, didean

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18:02 Oct 24, 2005
English to Gaelic translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / Scots language and colloquialisms
English term or phrase: scots' rock
Hello. What is the scots dialect word for rock?
xxxMavericker
Gaelic translation:carraig, creag, sgòrrbheann; cuigeal; tèarmunn, didean
Explanation:
carraig, creag, sgòrrbheann; cuigeal; tèarmunn, didean
as a noun form
(A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language)
Are we talking ‘rock and roll’ here (Rourke and Rule)?


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Note added at 12 days (2005-11-06 02:58:04 GMT) Post-grading
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Apologies, Mav. I am just a sad Sassenach with a Gaelic dictionary. I think there is a more than even chance that 'craik/craic' is cognate with 'carraig' and would certainly fit in with the use of this term to denote an evening's entertainment with music and dance. Re 'Cloch' and 'car' your guess is as good as mine. 'Rok/roke' look like loan words.
Kind regards from England
AJS
Selected response from:

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:15
Grading comment
Rock menaing stone.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3carraig, creag, sgòrrbheann; cuigeal; tèarmunn, didean
Lancashireman


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
carraig, creag, sgòrrbheann; cuigeal; tèarmunn, didean


Explanation:
carraig, creag, sgòrrbheann; cuigeal; tèarmunn, didean
as a noun form
(A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language)
Are we talking ‘rock and roll’ here (Rourke and Rule)?


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 days (2005-11-06 02:58:04 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Apologies, Mav. I am just a sad Sassenach with a Gaelic dictionary. I think there is a more than even chance that 'craik/craic' is cognate with 'carraig' and would certainly fit in with the use of this term to denote an evening's entertainment with music and dance. Re 'Cloch' and 'car' your guess is as good as mine. 'Rok/roke' look like loan words.
Kind regards from England
AJS

Lancashireman
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Rock menaing stone.
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