KudoZ home » English to German » Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting

TK

German translation: "To Come"

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
11:11 Nov 25, 2008
English to German translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting
English term or phrase: TK
Here are the sentences (captions from an art book):

"On the table is a bronze sculpture by Joseph Csaky and TK."
"The goose on the floor is Chinese TK."
"The cabinet was designed by Majorelle for the TK.
"Chateau G. was near ruin when Saint Laurent purchased it in TK."

What is TK?
Thank you for your help.
Karin Maack
Germany
Local time: 17:59
German translation:"To Come"
Explanation:
TK is an intentional phonetic misspelling. It is commonly used when one is unsure of something and has to add it later. This seems to be exactly the case with your text, as it is absolutely impossible for the abbreviation to stand for something else that makes sense in all four examples.
Selected response from:

Nikola Ivanov
Germany
Local time: 17:59
Grading comment
Thanks a lot! In this case I don't need a translation because the TK will have to be replaced anyway.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +2"To Come"
Nikola Ivanov
Summary of reference entries provided
TK = "To Come"
Nikola Ivanov
To Come is a printing and journalism reference abbreviated "TK."
Nicole Schnell

Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tk
"To Come"


Explanation:
TK is an intentional phonetic misspelling. It is commonly used when one is unsure of something and has to add it later. This seems to be exactly the case with your text, as it is absolutely impossible for the abbreviation to stand for something else that makes sense in all four examples.

Example sentence(s):
  • Mister X graduated from TK university.

    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Come
Nikola Ivanov
Germany
Local time: 17:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks a lot! In this case I don't need a translation because the TK will have to be replaced anyway.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD: This seems to be a truly *international* abbreviation!
1 day4 hrs

agree  Nicole Schnell
1 day6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


42 mins peer agreement (net): +6
Reference: TK = "To Come"

Reference information:
TK is an intentional phonetic misspelling. It is commonly used when one is unsure of something and has to add it later (most often in journalism). This seems to be exactly the case with your text, as it is absolutely impossible for the abbreviation to stand for something else that makes sense in all four example

Example sentence(s):
  • "Mister X graduated from TK university in the year Y"

    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Come
Nikola Ivanov
Germany
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  mill2: ah, I always thought it was To Know!
33 mins
agree  Inge Meinzer
2 hrs
agree  Nicole Schnell
3 hrs
agree  Anne Spitzmueller: makes sense :-)
8 hrs
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD: should I restore your answer -- for the glossary?
12 hrs
  -> I closed it because, technically, it is just an explanation of the English abbreviation, not a German translation/equilvalent which I haven't been able to find. Do it if you believe it's appropriate.
agree  Lonnie Legg: I don't know a German equivalent, other than the universal XXXX.
22 hrs
  -> Thanks! Neither do I, but I tried to research it before I wrote anything conclusive. So if you're absolutely sure, I would ask Dr. Timm to open the answer I've hidden so that it could be added to the glossary.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

48 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: To Come is a printing and journalism reference abbreviated "TK."

Reference information:
It is used to signify additional material will be added at a later date.

It is important to note that TK is an intentional misspelling designed to catch the eye (and also to be caught by computer software spell check programs.)

Occasionally a copy editor may mistakenly allow an article to be published with a stray TK intact, which is a source for much embarrassment and ridicule in the news room.

The Chicago Style Q&A on manuscript preparation describes it as imprecise, stating, "It’s best to be more straightforward and specific. For example, use bullets or boldface zeros (••• or 000) to stand in for page numbers that cannot be determined until a manuscript is paginated as a book (but see paragraph 2.37 in CMOS). For items like missing figures, describe exactly what’s missing. In electronic environments, you have recourse to comment features—like the syntax of SGML, which allows for descriptive instructions that will not interfere with the final version of a document. Make sure that whatever you do stops the project in its tracks at some point before publication."

However, the Chicago Manual of Style is geared for book publishers, and TK is much more prevalent in the magazine world than in the book world. TK may be more useful in the magazine world because magazines consist of a greater variety of heterogeneous forms of copy written and edited by a larger number of people under tighter deadlines. Under those conditions, it is more natural and useful for participants to stick TK in "unthinkingly" to save time. In the magazine world, it is common for even important factual details not to be nailed down until quite late in the process, even as the magazine is being typeset. In the book world, such matters are always decided well before the manuscript reaches the proof stage. So it's reasonable for the CMOS to look askance at TK -- even as magazine workers find it very useful to be able to write a phrase like "...went to university TK years ago..." without having to puzzle out what form that TK should take (dots or zeroes?), full in the knowledge that everybody involved in the process knows what is meant, that further work is needed.


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Come
Nicole Schnell
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 43

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Anne Spitzmueller: makes sense :-)
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search