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bigfoot

German translation: Großfuß

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:bigfoot
German translation:Großfuß
Entered by: Kim Metzger
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

21:25 Jan 5, 2002
English to German translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: bigfoot
I have a German Shepard puppy that has big feet, I wanted to know a few German translations to see if any of them would fit him
T Dove
Großfuß
Explanation:
That's the direct translation. ß can be spelled ss. So you could call your puppy Grossfuss. Fuss is pronounced fooce. Hope this helps.

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Note added at 2002-01-05 21:51:04 (GMT)
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See http://www.zeichentrickserien.de/darkwing.htm for Dances with Bigfoot (Tanzt mit Grossfuss)
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 13:53
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5Großfuß
Kim Metzger
4 +1Riesenpranke / Riesenpfote
Claudia Tomaschek
4 +1Pföterich - Big foot
Maya Jurt
5große Pfoten
Kathi Stock
4 -1Plattfuß
RWSTranslation


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
große Pfoten


Explanation:
..if it was a human it would be große Füße

Kathi Stock
United States
Local time: 13:53
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 930

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Thomas Bollmann: the translation is absolutely right, but it isn't a name
1 hr
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Großfuß


Explanation:
That's the direct translation. ß can be spelled ss. So you could call your puppy Grossfuss. Fuss is pronounced fooce. Hope this helps.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-05 21:51:04 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

See http://www.zeichentrickserien.de/darkwing.htm for Dances with Bigfoot (Tanzt mit Grossfuss)

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 13:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2598
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: If it has to be a German name, yes, absolutely.
9 mins

agree  Thomas Bollmann: doesn't sound that bad
54 mins

agree  Eva Blanar
1 hr

agree  Pro Lingua
1 hr

agree  xxxDr.G.MD: I agree with Thomas Bollmann
3 hrs
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Pföterich - Big foot


Explanation:
Pföterich means someone who has always his paws (hands) on you. Does not sound very nice and difficult to pronounce.

But why don't you call your dog simply Bigfoot? There are beautiful Indian legends about this man-like animal. I would love to have a dog called Bigfoot.


see link below.
Hello bigfoot!

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Note added at 2002-01-05 21:54:06 (GMT)
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\"Here in the Northwest, and west of the Rockies generally, Indian people regard Bigfoot with great respect. He is seen as a special kind of being, because of his obvious close relationship with humans. Some elders regard him as standing on the \"border\" between animal-style consciousness and human-style consciousness, which gives him a special kind of power. (It is not that Bigfoot\'s relationship to make him \"superior\" to other animals; in Indian culture, unlike western culture, animals are not regarded as \"inferior\" to humans but rather as \"elder brothers\" and \"teachers\" of humans. But tribal cultures everywhere are based on relationship and kinship; the closer the kinship, the stronger the bond. Man Indian elders in the Northwest refuse to eat bear meat because of the bear\'s similarity to humans, and Bigfoot is obviously much more similar to humans than is the bear. As beings who blend the \"natural knowledge\" of animals with something of the distinctive type of consciousness called \"intelligence\" that humans have, Bigfoot is regarded as a special type of being.\"




    Reference: http://www.bfro.net/legends/
Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 20:53
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 343

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Thomas Bollmann: "Pföterich" sounds quite strange in German
47 mins
  -> Of course it sounds strange! ;- ) That's a name Swiss women invented for certain men!! No offence meant.

agree  Trudy Peters: I would opt for Bigfoot, too. Gives me an idea for my next dog :-)
19 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Riesenpranke / Riesenpfote


Explanation:
Dogs actually don't have feet but paws. Both "Pfoten" and "Pranke" mean paw, though Pranke normally identifies the paws of bigger animals. The literal translation of "Riesen" is giant, so both names would mean "Giant paw".

As this is for a puppy, you could also all him "Riesenpfödchen" (the -chen means little), which means little giant paw (which is a a bit contradictory).

The spelling would be:

Riesenpfote = Ri:zenpfo:te
Riesenpranke = Ri:zenpra:nke
Riesenpfödchen = Ri:zenpfo(i)tcen

The c (for ch in -chen) is pronounced a bit like the h in hi or human

the o(i) (for ö in pfötchen) is pronounced like an o with a tiny i, a bit like the eu in interieur.

Cheers
Claudia

PS. I sometimes call my Collie "Stinkepfötchen Gerry" (little smelly paws Gerry).

Claudia Tomaschek
Local time: 20:53
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 877

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Thomas Bollmann: "Riesenpfötchen" is a very nice oxymoron and a beautiful name for a puppy
18 hrs
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1 day 19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Plattfuß


Explanation:
Ein grosser Fuss ist zwar nicht immer platt, aber ein platter Fuss ist meistens gross ;-)

RWSTranslation
Germany
Local time: 20:53
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 173

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Thomas Bollmann: schon etwas an den Haaren herbeigezogen ;-)), bei Plattfuß denke ich höchstens an Bud Spencer und nicht an ein kleines Hündchen
2 days 2 hrs
  -> aber "Plattfuß" eignet sich gut als Name im Gegensatz zu einigen der anderen Vorschläge
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