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compressor engagement/disengagement pressure

German translation: Presser Einschalt-/Abschaltdruck (oder Luftverdichter....)

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03:39 Aug 30, 2014
English to German translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks / rail
English term or phrase: compressor engagement/disengagement pressure
Hallo,

ich bin in eine arg technische Übersetzung "reingeschlittert" und das Original stammt zu allem Übel auch noch von einem Nicht-Muttersprachler. Eine Stunde Googeln bringt mir für dieses Paar die Möglichkeiten Öffnungsdruck/Schließdruck, Einrückdruck/Ausrückdruck, Zuschaltdruck/Abschaltdruck und noch viele andere ... Hilfe! Kennt sich jemand aus? Es geht um die Überprüfung der Bremsanlage bei einem Schienenfahrzeug. Der Kompressor ist also Teil der Bremsanlage. Das Original:

Check compressor engagement pressure (Theoretical value: 8,5 +/- 0,3 bar)
Check compressor disengagement pressure (Theoretical value. 7,8 +/- 0,3 bar)

Danke!
lusatia
Germany
German translation:Presser Einschalt-/Abschaltdruck (oder Luftverdichter....)
Explanation:
The basic principles of railway brakes are similar to those on (heavy) road goods vehicles, so please have a look at section 3.1.2.1 of the document on:

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:1...

For reasons of their own, possibly historical, the DB uses the expression "(Luft)-presser" instead of the more commen "Luftverdichter" for air compressor. The locomotive or traction unit is equipped with an air compressor to keep the air pressure in the air-brake pipe, which runs throughout the train, at a sufficiently high pressure to keep the brakes "off". The compressor has a pressure switch which cuts the compressor in if the pressure drops below a certain design level, and to cut it out when the pressure reaches a higher level. These levels of course bracket the desired level, which here must be about 8.2 bar.

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Note added at 5 hrs (2014-08-30 08:50:30 GMT)
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I find the "dis/engagement pressure" somewhat unusual here, to say the least, but as you say the text was written by a non-native speaker, that clearly is the explanation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day16 hrs (2014-08-31 20:20:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here's a "(Luft-)Presser" for you: so it's a Unimog, but the principle's the same, believe me. If you are in any doubt, ask any (German) train driver what he understands by a "Presser"; don't necessarily set too much store by Swiss watch experts - I'm not sure SBB drivers use the same exprtession...
http://www.unimog-community.de/phpBB3/defekter-luftpresser-z...
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 16:24
Grading comment
Thank you all for your help. I already graded this answer a few days ago, but for some reason my post didn't appear. "Dis/engagement" indeed seems unusual here, as far as I know this term is rather used with clutches. About the "Presser" bit I'm not sure and will leave it for discussion. Thanks again.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 -1Presser Einschalt-/Abschaltdruck (oder Luftverdichter....)David Moore


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Presser Einschalt-/Abschaltdruck (oder Luftverdichter....)


Explanation:
The basic principles of railway brakes are similar to those on (heavy) road goods vehicles, so please have a look at section 3.1.2.1 of the document on:

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:1...

For reasons of their own, possibly historical, the DB uses the expression "(Luft)-presser" instead of the more commen "Luftverdichter" for air compressor. The locomotive or traction unit is equipped with an air compressor to keep the air pressure in the air-brake pipe, which runs throughout the train, at a sufficiently high pressure to keep the brakes "off". The compressor has a pressure switch which cuts the compressor in if the pressure drops below a certain design level, and to cut it out when the pressure reaches a higher level. These levels of course bracket the desired level, which here must be about 8.2 bar.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2014-08-30 08:50:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I find the "dis/engagement pressure" somewhat unusual here, to say the least, but as you say the text was written by a non-native speaker, that clearly is the explanation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day16 hrs (2014-08-31 20:20:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here's a "(Luft-)Presser" for you: so it's a Unimog, but the principle's the same, believe me. If you are in any doubt, ask any (German) train driver what he understands by a "Presser"; don't necessarily set too much store by Swiss watch experts - I'm not sure SBB drivers use the same exprtession...
http://www.unimog-community.de/phpBB3/defekter-luftpresser-z...

David Moore
Local time: 16:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 147
Grading comment
Thank you all for your help. I already graded this answer a few days ago, but for some reason my post didn't appear. "Dis/engagement" indeed seems unusual here, as far as I know this term is rather used with clutches. About the "Presser" bit I'm not sure and will leave it for discussion. Thanks again.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Rolf Kern: Die 5 ist zu hoch gegriffen und der Begriff "Presser" ist unmöglich und "Luftverdichter" ist unglücklich.// Better idea? No. See what Rolf Keller wrote in the Discussion. He is known to unfortunately never post answers...
1 day 6 hrs
  -> This is railways, obviously: do you have any better idea? //And that justifies a 'disagree'???///In any case, my answer was posted well after Rolf Keller's post, so what are you driving at?
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