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Fellow

German translation: Fellow

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Fellow
German translation:Fellow
Entered by: DDM
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01:09 Jul 6, 2007
English to German translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering
English term or phrase: Fellow
xxx,***Fellow*** of the Chartered Institute of Building (FCIOB) (retired)
June 2007

Der im Glossar vorhandene Eintrag hilft mir nicht viel weiter. Was bedeutet Fellow hier genau?

CIOB heisst wohl im Übrigen "Berufsorganisation für Baumanagement"
DDM
Mexico
Fellow
Explanation:
The term is actually defined in Wahrig as "(in England) Mitglied einer wissenschaftl. Vereinigung, eines Kolleges...", so I think you should capitalise it and let it stand. The translation of the English title is not exactly impressive; where is the "Chartered" bit to indicate the society has a Royal Charter? (Granted in 1980, BTW)

I think that no equivalent exists in Germany; it may be well to add a suitable note. To become a member of such a society or institute, one needs academic qualifications in conjunction with at least three years' professional experience, but to become a fellow, one has to be ELECTED by the membership. Candidates for this honour must also demonstrate hgih levels of experience and ability, but DON'T ask me how these "fellows" benefit from this; I am not into such esoteric secrets, but I suspect it has more to do with the prestige of carrying the "F" entitlement onto their letterheads than with any other facet of professional life. I do know for sure it doesn't mean they have free (honorary) membership for the rest of their lives, 'cos a young lady at the CIOB told me...
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 21:15
Grading comment
Thank you!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1FellowDavid Moore
4Ehren(mitglied)Teresa Reinhardt


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
fellow
Ehren(mitglied)


Explanation:
you should be able to find a definition of what fellowship means for that association; it's usually a title that is given for professional, civic or scientific/scholarly merits by an association to honor an individual member
BTW, I would not translate that

Teresa Reinhardt
United States
Local time: 12:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 101

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrew D: als (Ehren-)Mitglied berufen z.b. bei der Royal Society
5 hrs

disagree  David Moore: If you look up the CIOB web-site, the "fellow" has to be elected, but it is NOT an "honorary" hono(u)r - which an "Ehren-Mitglied" is, to the best of my knowledge.
8 hrs
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fellow
Fellow


Explanation:
The term is actually defined in Wahrig as "(in England) Mitglied einer wissenschaftl. Vereinigung, eines Kolleges...", so I think you should capitalise it and let it stand. The translation of the English title is not exactly impressive; where is the "Chartered" bit to indicate the society has a Royal Charter? (Granted in 1980, BTW)

I think that no equivalent exists in Germany; it may be well to add a suitable note. To become a member of such a society or institute, one needs academic qualifications in conjunction with at least three years' professional experience, but to become a fellow, one has to be ELECTED by the membership. Candidates for this honour must also demonstrate hgih levels of experience and ability, but DON'T ask me how these "fellows" benefit from this; I am not into such esoteric secrets, but I suspect it has more to do with the prestige of carrying the "F" entitlement onto their letterheads than with any other facet of professional life. I do know for sure it doesn't mean they have free (honorary) membership for the rest of their lives, 'cos a young lady at the CIOB told me...


David Moore
Local time: 21:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 125
Grading comment
Thank you!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Olaf Reibedanz: Yes, I would just leave it in English
1 hr
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