KudoZ home » English to German » Other

hoot, belt, continental voice

German translation: see below

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
20:40 Sep 7, 2000
English to German translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: hoot, belt, continental voice
From a text about voice instruction for young children.
...the balance of the resonance system of young children's voices is usually a question of adopting a style, e.g.the chorister"hoot", the "belt" voice, the "continental" focus...
I checked Google and found many interesting hits concerning owls in children's books. A search of some musical glossaries was unsuccessful. Any singing translators out there who can help me out?
Johanna Timm, PhD
Canada
Local time: 19:55
German translation:see below
Explanation:
Actually, I couldn't carry a tune in a bucket, and I don't know how much help this will be, but here goes:
belting = schnüren
See:
http://www.nmz.de/nmz/nmz1997/nmz9707/dossier/stimme_in_popm...
for a discussion of Bruststimme vs. Kopfstimme, etc., their ratios, etc.

A search on choristers' hoot netted the following URL which I thought might also be interesting for your purposes:
http://216.147.109.215/hist001.html (small excerpt follows)
There is little evidence of the choirboy 'hoot, but a fine example of the old "Cathedral Tone" is given in Gordon Carter's O for the Wings of a Dove, which he sings with Manchester Cathedral Choir. I wanted to find out exactly how these boys were trained and by whom. One of the best Victorian choir-training manuals, "Boys' Voices", by John Spencer Curwen, contains much advice given by famous choirmasters of the day. The general opinion was to train boys to use the head register and to get rid of any trace of the 'rough chest voice'. A few choirmasters did acknowledge the use of the chest register for the lower notes, but they could not agree on which note it should be introduced. Exercises were given for the correct cultivation of the head tone. Scales were practised downwards, never upwards. Boys were told to 'hum' to get the voice into the head. Fingers were placed between the eyes and on the top of the head in order to focus the tone. The correct position of the mouth had to be gained by putting the thumb between the teeth or by looking through a hand mirror. There was much practice of vowels, not just the "oo" sound which tends to produce the hoot if over-used.

Then, searching on Kopfstimme / Bruststimme, I found some URLs that might be useful:

http://www.nmz.de/nmz/nmz1997/nmz9707/dossier/stimme_in_popm...
Singen mit Kindern – aber wie?
http://www.fidula.de/musikpraxis/singen.htm
http://www.phonetik.uni-muenchen.de/MUSE/Seminare/PHON_Einf/...
Not much, but it's maybe a start. Try going to "ähnliche Seiten" from there.
Have a hoot! Or a belt! ;-)
Selected response from:

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 19:55
Grading comment
Brilliant as usual, I even got to hear a falsetto voice by way of an audio file!!
Der Kandidat hat 4 Punkte!! ( you deserve 8, at least).Regards, J.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
nasee belowUlrike Lieder


  

Answers


43 mins
see below


Explanation:
Actually, I couldn't carry a tune in a bucket, and I don't know how much help this will be, but here goes:
belting = schnüren
See:
http://www.nmz.de/nmz/nmz1997/nmz9707/dossier/stimme_in_popm...
for a discussion of Bruststimme vs. Kopfstimme, etc., their ratios, etc.

A search on choristers' hoot netted the following URL which I thought might also be interesting for your purposes:
http://216.147.109.215/hist001.html (small excerpt follows)
There is little evidence of the choirboy 'hoot, but a fine example of the old "Cathedral Tone" is given in Gordon Carter's O for the Wings of a Dove, which he sings with Manchester Cathedral Choir. I wanted to find out exactly how these boys were trained and by whom. One of the best Victorian choir-training manuals, "Boys' Voices", by John Spencer Curwen, contains much advice given by famous choirmasters of the day. The general opinion was to train boys to use the head register and to get rid of any trace of the 'rough chest voice'. A few choirmasters did acknowledge the use of the chest register for the lower notes, but they could not agree on which note it should be introduced. Exercises were given for the correct cultivation of the head tone. Scales were practised downwards, never upwards. Boys were told to 'hum' to get the voice into the head. Fingers were placed between the eyes and on the top of the head in order to focus the tone. The correct position of the mouth had to be gained by putting the thumb between the teeth or by looking through a hand mirror. There was much practice of vowels, not just the "oo" sound which tends to produce the hoot if over-used.

Then, searching on Kopfstimme / Bruststimme, I found some URLs that might be useful:

http://www.nmz.de/nmz/nmz1997/nmz9707/dossier/stimme_in_popm...
Singen mit Kindern – aber wie?
http://www.fidula.de/musikpraxis/singen.htm
http://www.phonetik.uni-muenchen.de/MUSE/Seminare/PHON_Einf/...
Not much, but it's maybe a start. Try going to "ähnliche Seiten" from there.
Have a hoot! Or a belt! ;-)

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 19:55
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 1505
Grading comment
Brilliant as usual, I even got to hear a falsetto voice by way of an audio file!!
Der Kandidat hat 4 Punkte!! ( you deserve 8, at least).Regards, J.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search