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pepper nuts cookies

German translation: Pfeffernüsse

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pepper-nut cookies
German translation:Pfeffernüsse
Entered by: Maya Jurt
Options:
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14:01 Jan 3, 2002
English to German translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: pepper nuts cookies
My grandmother used to make pepper nut cookies which I think she called pfeffernuse.
Richard C Schettler
Pfeffernuse
Explanation:
Here is the recipe:

RecipeSource: Pfeffernuse
... ----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05 Title: Pfeffernuse Categories: Cookies
Yield: 36 servings 2 1/4 c All-purpose flour 1/3 c Granulated sugar 1 ts ...
www.recipesource.com/desserts/cookies/20/rec2037.html

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Note added at 2002-01-03 14:18:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Originally, it seems to be an Amish recipe, that is why I could not find any german link. Italians seem to make those cookies as well.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 17:00:57 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Title: Pfeffernuse
Categories: Cookies
Yield: 36 servings

2 1/4 c All-purpose flour
1/3 c Granulated sugar
1 ts Ground cinnamon
1 ts Ground ginger
1/2 ts Baking powder
1/2 ts Salt
1/4 ts Pepper
1/4 ts Ground nutmeg
1/4 ts Ground cloves
1/3 c Dark molasses
1/3 c Butter or margarine; melted
1 Egg
Confectioner\'s sugar

Preheat oven to moderate (375 degrees). Combine flour, sugar, cinnamon,
ginger, baking powder, salt, pepper, nutmeg and cloves in large bowl. Stir
in molasses and butter with wooden spoon. Mix in egg until blended (the
dough will be stiff). Shape into 1\" balls, using about 1-1/2 teaspoons per
cookie. Place 1\" apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake in preheated
moderate oven (375 degrees) for 10 to 12 minutes or until wooden pick
inserted in center of cookie comes out clean; cookies will crack. Remove
cookies to wire rack. Roll in confectioners\' sugar while still warm and
return to rack to cool completely.

-----


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:34:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For Michaelas information:
http://www.iamccreliefsale.org/food.htm
Pfeffernuse (a traditional Amish anis-flavored cookie)

The Amish emigrated from thre triangle Alsace/SouthernGermany, Switzerland to the States and they spoke German. As for Pfeffernüsse, this is an assumption which might be correct, but I do not know. For there are no nuts in the cookie.


Selected response from:

Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 03:37
Grading comment
Respondent provided translation and also recipe. I was able then to provide same to older relatives who are not i-net literate. Many thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +5PfeffernüssexxxDr.G.MD
5 +2Pfeffernüsse
Rasha Brinkmann-Yahya
5Pfeffernuesse
5PfeffernuesseChristine Healy-Rendel
5Pfeffernuesse
5Pfeffernuesse
5Pfeffernuesse
4 +1Pfefferkuchen
Thomas Bollmann
5Pfeffernuesse
4 -2Pfeffernuse
Maya Jurt


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Pfefferkuchen


Explanation:
My Grandma told them "Pfefferkuchen", it's a kind of "Lebkuchen", I loved them

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 14:19:19 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, I forgot, Pfefferkuchen has nothing to do with cake, the name is misleading, they are cookies


    experience
Thomas Bollmann
Germany
Local time: 03:37
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 66

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Uwe Kirmse
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Pfeffernüsse


Explanation:
I think that is what is Grandma and Richard have in mind.

Lots of tasty little cookies - a Kuchen would be a cake.

Enjoy !


    native German speaker
xxxDr.G.MD
Local time: 03:37
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 715

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger: Yummi!
1 min

agree  Ursula Peter-Czichi: Spicy little cookies
50 mins

agree  Alison Schwitzgebel
2 hrs

agree  Uwe Kirmse: Yes, but Pfefferkuchen is the same, it's not a cake! These words are used regionally.
2 hrs

neutral  Michaela Müller: Agree with Uwe - Kuchen here isn't cake!
3 hrs

agree  Uschi (Ursula) Walke: see pictura at URL oasis.gasligtmedia.com/dutchoven/bakery.htm
19 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Pfeffernuse


Explanation:
Here is the recipe:

RecipeSource: Pfeffernuse
... ----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05 Title: Pfeffernuse Categories: Cookies
Yield: 36 servings 2 1/4 c All-purpose flour 1/3 c Granulated sugar 1 ts ...
www.recipesource.com/desserts/cookies/20/rec2037.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 14:18:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Originally, it seems to be an Amish recipe, that is why I could not find any german link. Italians seem to make those cookies as well.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 17:00:57 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Title: Pfeffernuse
Categories: Cookies
Yield: 36 servings

2 1/4 c All-purpose flour
1/3 c Granulated sugar
1 ts Ground cinnamon
1 ts Ground ginger
1/2 ts Baking powder
1/2 ts Salt
1/4 ts Pepper
1/4 ts Ground nutmeg
1/4 ts Ground cloves
1/3 c Dark molasses
1/3 c Butter or margarine; melted
1 Egg
Confectioner\'s sugar

Preheat oven to moderate (375 degrees). Combine flour, sugar, cinnamon,
ginger, baking powder, salt, pepper, nutmeg and cloves in large bowl. Stir
in molasses and butter with wooden spoon. Mix in egg until blended (the
dough will be stiff). Shape into 1\" balls, using about 1-1/2 teaspoons per
cookie. Place 1\" apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake in preheated
moderate oven (375 degrees) for 10 to 12 minutes or until wooden pick
inserted in center of cookie comes out clean; cookies will crack. Remove
cookies to wire rack. Roll in confectioners\' sugar while still warm and
return to rack to cool completely.

-----


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 18:34:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For Michaelas information:
http://www.iamccreliefsale.org/food.htm
Pfeffernuse (a traditional Amish anis-flavored cookie)

The Amish emigrated from thre triangle Alsace/SouthernGermany, Switzerland to the States and they spoke German. As for Pfeffernüsse, this is an assumption which might be correct, but I do not know. For there are no nuts in the cookie.





    Reference: http://www.recipesource.com/desserts/cookies/20/rec2037.html
Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 03:37
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 343
Grading comment
Respondent provided translation and also recipe. I was able then to provide same to older relatives who are not i-net literate. Many thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Uwe Kirmse: It's not German, only the English way to spell Pfeffernüsse!
2 hrs
  -> I said it was Amish, didn't I? Happy 02

disagree  Michaela Müller: Agree with Uwe-Richard was asking for the German word.Why do you assume it is an Amish recipe? As far as I know, it is a Franconian recipe.Happy 02!
3 hrs
  -> See comment about the Amish.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Pfeffernuesse


Explanation:
pepper nut cookies means Pfeffer Nuss Kekse, but the German name for it is Pfeffernüsse, spelled also Pfeffernuesse for those who can't find a ü on their Keyboard. They are little dry cookies, a kind of gingerbread (Lebkuchen / Honigkuchen) and are defenetively German Christmas Cookies.
If you need a recipe http://paml.alastra.com/recipes/german/default.html offers a couple of different ones (in English). The spelling is different from the "German" spelling, so the English spelling is probably Pfeffernuse.



Native speaker of:

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Pfeffernuesse


Explanation:
pepper nut cookies means Pfeffer Nuss Kekse, but the German name for it is Pfeffernüsse, spelled also Pfeffernuesse for those who can't find a ü on their Keyboard. They are little dry cookies, a kind of gingerbread (Lebkuchen / Honigkuchen) and are defenetively German Christmas Cookies.
If you need a recipe http://paml.alastra.com/recipes/german/default.html offers a couple of different ones (in English). The spelling is different from the "German" spelling, so the English spelling is probably Pfeffernuse.



Native speaker of:

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Pfeffernuesse


Explanation:
pepper nut cookies means Pfeffer Nuss Kekse, but the German name for it is Pfeffernüsse, spelled also Pfeffernuesse for those who can't find a ü on their Keyboard. They are little dry cookies, a kind of gingerbread (Lebkuchen / Honigkuchen) and are defenetively German Christmas Cookies.
If you need a recipe http://paml.alastra.com/recipes/german/default.html offers a couple of different ones (in English). The spelling is different from the "German" spelling, so the English spelling is probably Pfeffernuse.



Native speaker of:

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Pfeffernuesse


Explanation:
pepper nut cookies means Pfeffer Nuss Kekse, but the German name for it is Pfeffernüsse, spelled also Pfeffernuesse for those who can't find a ü on their Keyboard. They are little dry cookies, a kind of gingerbread (Lebkuchen / Honigkuchen) and are defenetively German Christmas Cookies.
If you need a recipe http://paml.alastra.com/recipes/german/default.html offers a couple of different ones (in English). The spelling is different from the "German" spelling, so the English spelling is probably Pfeffernuse.



Native speaker of:

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Pfeffernuesse


Explanation:
pepper nut cookies means Pfeffer Nuss Kekse, but the German name for it is Pfeffernüsse, spelled also Pfeffernuesse for those who can't find a ü on their Keyboard. They are little dry cookies, a kind of gingerbread (Lebkuchen / Honigkuchen) and are defenetively German Christmas Cookies.
If you need a recipe http://paml.alastra.com/recipes/german/default.html offers a couple of different ones (in English). The spelling is different from the "German" spelling, so the English spelling is probably Pfeffernuse.



Native speaker of:

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Pfeffernüsse


Explanation:
Pfeffernüsse

Ingredients:
500 g Flour
3 level teaspoons baking powder
300 g sugar
2 eggs
6 tablespoons milk
1 pinch of each of the following:
ginger powder, ground gloves, nutmeg, white pepper
1 teaspoon cinnamon
scraped skin of ½ lemon and ½ orange
60 g grated almonds
30 g candied lemon peel cut in very small cubes
For the icing:
Mix 200 g sifted powdered sugar with
2-3 tablespoons hot water
Preparation:
Mix flour and baking powder and sift it. Press a pit in the middle, put eggs, sugar, milk and the spices in there and mix it with a part of the flour/baking powder mix. Then add the remaining ingredients on top of it and knead it to a smooth dough. Roll it out to a 1 cm thick layer. Cut out little circles of a 2-3 cm diameter, place them on a greased cookie sheet and bake them in the pre-heated oven. After they cooled off, put the icing on the cookies.
Heat: 180 degrees Celsius
Baking time: approx. 20 minutes

There is a units conversion on the proz.com site, where you can look up the measurements, if you live in the US.

Guten Appetit! :-)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-03 17:03:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Make the icing after the cookies are out of the oven, it may get too thick, if it stands around for too long. Also, leave the cookies outside for a couple of days (only if it is not too humid in your area), before storing them in a tin can.

Rasha Brinkmann-Yahya
Local time: 21:37
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michaela Müller
27 mins

agree  Maya Jurt: I think Richard should try out the two recipes and decide what his grandmother made.
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Pfeffernuesse


Explanation:
The answer is definitely Pfeffernuesse. I'm 100% sure about this; I'm a native German and just recently ate them at Christmas time. Pfeffernuesse are cookies, not a cake. They are made out of gingerbread and usually have a white powdersugar coat (sometimes they are chocolate-covered as well).

Christine Healy-Rendel
PRO pts in pair: 223
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