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banana fritter

German translation: Banane(n)fritte

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:banana fritter
German translation:Banane(n)fritte
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
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01:34 Jan 3, 2001
English to German translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: banana fritter
What's the German equivalent? (Fritte? Pfannkuchen?)
Klara Hurkova
Local time: 17:11
"Bananefritte" oder "banana fritter"
Explanation:
A fritter is a relatively thin consistency dough or batter with something mixed into it like corn kernels or chunks of banana/apple/vegetables/fish/meat then deep-fried (frittiert). Langenscheidt – Der kleine Muret-Sanders shows "Beignet" (Schmalzgebäck mit Füllung), but my big German-German Duden shows "Beignet" = "Krapfen or Berliner" which are more like jelly doughnuts, which would not be right. The dough or batter for fritters is much thinner than that for doughnuts. Much of the dough separates from the filling (fruit/vegetables/meat) as it is spooned into the hot fat. Duden/Oxford – Großwörterbuch shows "Bananestücke in Pfannkuchenteig" which sounds more like "banana pancakes" because the deep frying bit is important.

None of all that sounds exactly like what my mommy made for us back in Missouri 50 years ago. The English word comes from the German "Fritte" so I think that would be quite OK - "Bananefritte". Some German sites do not even translate the term, for example:

http://www.loose-verlag.de/tips/essen.html

http://zemm.ira.uka.de/~bachmor/Diary/Dezember.html

http://www.adventure-holidays.com/NZ-newsletter/Newsletter/N...

http://www.karibik.de/karibik/essen.htm

The following German site shows the connection with "Pfannkuchen" and "Beignet", but for me it is a less than satisfactory translation:

http://www.klosterkeller.potsdam.de/menuekarte.html

HTH - Dan
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 17:11
Grading comment
Many thanks for your explanantion and the detailed comment! Now I know exactly what a "banana fritter" is (and would like to taste it...).
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naBananenfritte
Ilena
naBananen-Beignets
Anja Brito
na"Bananefritte" oder "banana fritter"Dan McCrosky


  

Answers


1 hr
"Bananefritte" oder "banana fritter"


Explanation:
A fritter is a relatively thin consistency dough or batter with something mixed into it like corn kernels or chunks of banana/apple/vegetables/fish/meat then deep-fried (frittiert). Langenscheidt – Der kleine Muret-Sanders shows "Beignet" (Schmalzgebäck mit Füllung), but my big German-German Duden shows "Beignet" = "Krapfen or Berliner" which are more like jelly doughnuts, which would not be right. The dough or batter for fritters is much thinner than that for doughnuts. Much of the dough separates from the filling (fruit/vegetables/meat) as it is spooned into the hot fat. Duden/Oxford – Großwörterbuch shows "Bananestücke in Pfannkuchenteig" which sounds more like "banana pancakes" because the deep frying bit is important.

None of all that sounds exactly like what my mommy made for us back in Missouri 50 years ago. The English word comes from the German "Fritte" so I think that would be quite OK - "Bananefritte". Some German sites do not even translate the term, for example:

http://www.loose-verlag.de/tips/essen.html

http://zemm.ira.uka.de/~bachmor/Diary/Dezember.html

http://www.adventure-holidays.com/NZ-newsletter/Newsletter/N...

http://www.karibik.de/karibik/essen.htm

The following German site shows the connection with "Pfannkuchen" and "Beignet", but for me it is a less than satisfactory translation:

http://www.klosterkeller.potsdam.de/menuekarte.html

HTH - Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 17:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 390
Grading comment
Many thanks for your explanantion and the detailed comment! Now I know exactly what a "banana fritter" is (and would like to taste it...).
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs
Bananen-Beignets


Explanation:
I don't think I agree with Dan on the "Bananefritte" - I have never ever heard that word, plus the German term "Fritte(n)" is really short for "Pomme(s) Fritte(s)" i.e. French Fries.
I liked the suggested term "Beignet" much better, since it does convey the idea of something mixed into a batter and then deep fried.
Alternatively, I might also suggest "ausgebackene Banane(nstücke)" - ausgebacken also meaning something deep fried in a batter, but I think Beignet would be the more elegant solution.
Regards,
Anja

Anja Brito
Canada
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 31
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13 hrs
Bananenfritte


Explanation:
I agree with Dan on the Bananenfritte. Anja would be right with "Fritten" standing for french fries, if it would be written in plural. Fritte is the singular and can be found in Duden as "Schmelzgemenge", "Gebackenes", "(nur Plural) Kurzbez. für Pommes frites".
As the first two terms indicate, fritten would really be the best solution - although I've also never heard of a Bananenfritte.
I hope you can use this information.
Ilena

Ilena
Local time: 18:11
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in GreekGreek
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