KudoZ home » English to German » Other

microserf

German translation: Computersklave

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:microserf
German translation:Computersklave
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

02:44 Aug 19, 2001
English to German translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: microserf
don't know
xxxSprachprof
Local time: 01:25
Computersklave
Explanation:
Sven's geriatric brain is certainly on the right track. But his suggestion would not be understandable in a German context, unless they know the book.

I think a more general translation is required, that gives the same sense. "Computersklave" should do very well.

HTH
Selected response from:

Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 01:25
Grading comment
Thank you. This word is most understandable for me.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
na +1MicrosklaveDan McCrosky
na +1Computersklave
Alexander Schleber
nano better answers, just more backgroundDan McCrosky
naMikrosklave
Sven Petersson
naMikroserf
Sven Petersson
naAddendum to my answer:
Sven Petersson
na -1Generation X
Sven Petersson


  

Answers


7 mins
Mikroserf


Explanation:
microserf /mi:'kro-s*rf/ [popularized, though not originated, by Douglas Copeland's book "Microserfs"] A programmer at <Microsoft.html>, especially a low-level coder with little chance of fame or fortune.


    Reference: http://info.astrian.net/jargon/terms/m/microserf.html
    My geriatric brain.
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 434
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins
Addendum to my answer:


Explanation:
"serf" is Russian for "Leibeigener".


    My geriatric brain.
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 434
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

53 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Computersklave


Explanation:
Sven's geriatric brain is certainly on the right track. But his suggestion would not be understandable in a German context, unless they know the book.

I think a more general translation is required, that gives the same sense. "Computersklave" should do very well.

HTH


    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?as_q=Computersklave&num=10&btnG...
Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1466
Grading comment
Thank you. This word is most understandable for me.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gangels

disagree  Sven Petersson: I may not have found the ideal word, but your suggestion kills the double meaning in "micro"!
4 mins
  -> "micro" is an abbrzevuiation of microcomputer, i.e. a computer. Its not equivalent to Microsoft!

agree  Johanna Timm, PhD: 4
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
Mikrosklave


Explanation:
Alternative suggestion.


    My geriatric brain.
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 434
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
Microsklave


Explanation:
"Serf" is from Latin "servus" via French into English but does mean an agricultural bound laborer = Leibeigene.

The Coupland book title has already been translated as "Microsklave" as per these sites:

http://www.orga.uni-sb.de/bibliothek/buecher/festschrift/fes...

http://www.ad-rem.de/zeitungsinhalt/1998/1998-16/169807.html

Because the term "Microserf" refers to a computer slave for the Microsoft Corporation, the translation "Microsklave" might be more precise.

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 390

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ulrike Lieder
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr peer agreement (net): -1
Generation X


Explanation:
The German edition was titled "Generation X".


    Reference: http://www.s-trip.de/dc/html/magazine/strip/frischgepresst/f...
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 434

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxJon Zuber: Generation X is another Coupland novel.
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs
no better answers, just more background


Explanation:
"Generation X" pulled over 100,000 Google, English, .com hits, which is not too surprising because it is not only the German title but also the original English title of a different Coupland book, published five years before "Microserfs", as per this site:

http://shop.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?is...

"Coupland's three main characters, Andy, Claire, and Dag, are the spokespersons for Generation X, a group born of the late 1950s and early 1960s, who are 'under-employed, over-educated, intensely private and unpredictable.' . . . {They} actively reject rampant consumerism and stifling bourgeois sensibilities for a minimalistic life in the California desert. Here Andy, Claire, and Dag regale each other with fantastic, futuristic tales that speak of loneliness and desperation."

Andy, Claire, and Dag were definitely not Microserfs when they were out in the middle of the desert. This whole question and answer exchange is becoming a bit peinlich.

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 390
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search