KudoZ home » English to German » Tech/Engineering

gypsy vardo

German translation: Zigeunerwagen

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:gypsy vardo
German translation:Zigeunerwagen
Entered by: Endre Both
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

12:36 Feb 4, 2001
English to German translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering
English term or phrase: gypsy vardo
mobile homes - the modern equivalent of the decorated gypsy vardo
Susanne
Zigeunerwagen
Explanation:
Vardo is equivalent to waggon.

The whole idea of building a gypsy wagon, or Vardo, came about because I really don't like camping, but I really DO like going to Pennsic. It's a big medieval re-enactment that we attend every year.
www.enslin.com/rae/gypsy/wagon.htm
(This site also has some pictures and drawings).

The Romany Vardo of the English Gypsies
The Romany Gypsies seem to have taken to the waggon or vardo about the middle of the nineteenth century. George Borrow writing in his Romano Lavo-Lil, which he finished in 1873, says that the caravans were not very numerous on the roads at this stage and it is true that many Gypsies continued to live in bender tents right up to the end of the century. The Gypsy style of waggon was certainly in vogue however, even as early as 1840 when Charles Dickens described Mrs. Jarley's van with its bed, stove, closet or larder and several chests (Old Curiosity Shop, ch. xxvii):
One half of it... was carpeted, and so partitioned off at the further end as to accommodate a sleeping-place, constructed after the fashion of a berth on board ship, which was shaded, like the windows, with fair white curtains... The other half served for a kitchen, and was fitted up with a stove whose small chimney passed through the roof. It also held a closet or larder, several chests, a great pitcher of water, and a few cooking-utensils and articles of crockery. These latter necessaries hung upon the walls, which in that portion of the establishment devoted to the lady of the caravan, were ornamented with such gayer and lighter decorations as a triangle and a couple of well-thumbed tambourines
ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/rogerbaker/gypsy_vardos.html

HTH!
Selected response from:

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 08:57
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naZigeunerwagenUlrike Lieder


  

Answers


16 mins
Zigeunerwagen


Explanation:
Vardo is equivalent to waggon.

The whole idea of building a gypsy wagon, or Vardo, came about because I really don't like camping, but I really DO like going to Pennsic. It's a big medieval re-enactment that we attend every year.
www.enslin.com/rae/gypsy/wagon.htm
(This site also has some pictures and drawings).

The Romany Vardo of the English Gypsies
The Romany Gypsies seem to have taken to the waggon or vardo about the middle of the nineteenth century. George Borrow writing in his Romano Lavo-Lil, which he finished in 1873, says that the caravans were not very numerous on the roads at this stage and it is true that many Gypsies continued to live in bender tents right up to the end of the century. The Gypsy style of waggon was certainly in vogue however, even as early as 1840 when Charles Dickens described Mrs. Jarley's van with its bed, stove, closet or larder and several chests (Old Curiosity Shop, ch. xxvii):
One half of it... was carpeted, and so partitioned off at the further end as to accommodate a sleeping-place, constructed after the fashion of a berth on board ship, which was shaded, like the windows, with fair white curtains... The other half served for a kitchen, and was fitted up with a stove whose small chimney passed through the roof. It also held a closet or larder, several chests, a great pitcher of water, and a few cooking-utensils and articles of crockery. These latter necessaries hung upon the walls, which in that portion of the establishment devoted to the lady of the caravan, were ornamented with such gayer and lighter decorations as a triangle and a couple of well-thumbed tambourines
ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/rogerbaker/gypsy_vardos.html

HTH!

Ulrike Lieder
Local time: 08:57
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 1505

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
gwolf
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search