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You can always change your mind if you're too busy

Greek (Ancient) translation: libet tibi semper mentem mutare, si eris occupatus

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:You can always change your mind if you\'re too busy
Greek (Ancient) translation:libet tibi semper mentem mutare, si eris occupatus
Entered by: xxxCoisa Gostos
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08:07 Sep 29, 2011
English to Greek (Ancient) translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / general
English term or phrase: You can always change your mind if you're too busy
Sorry, no context.

Thank you for your help!
xxxCoisa Gostos
Local time: 09:40
libet tibi semper mentem mutare, si eris occupatus
Explanation:
So you yould invite one man. To two men or to both men and women you would say:

libet vobis . . . si eritis occupati

To one woman:

libet tibi . . . si eris occupata

To two women:

libet vobis . . . si eritis occupatae

'Lubet' is archaic and early classical for 'libet', 'it pleases', which is the predicate of the substantive clause with the infinitive, itself the protasis of a future more vivid (future logical or real) condition.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1Αἰεὶ δύναιο/αισθε μεταβουλεύεσθαι ἄν εἰ εἴης/εἴητε λίαν ἄσχολος/οι
Dominic Galante
5 -1libet tibi semper mentem mutare, si eris occupatus
Joseph Brazauskas


  

Answers


4 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
you can always change your mind if you're too busy
libet tibi semper mentem mutare, si eris occupatus


Explanation:
So you yould invite one man. To two men or to both men and women you would say:

libet vobis . . . si eritis occupati

To one woman:

libet tibi . . . si eris occupata

To two women:

libet vobis . . . si eritis occupatae

'Lubet' is archaic and early classical for 'libet', 'it pleases', which is the predicate of the substantive clause with the infinitive, itself the protasis of a future more vivid (future logical or real) condition.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Dominic Galante: This isn't Greek.
217 days
  -> Clearly it's not, though at the time the question was first posted a Latin translation was wanted.
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221 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
you can always change your mind if you're too busy
Αἰεὶ δύναιο/αισθε μεταβουλεύεσθαι ἄν εἰ εἴης/εἴητε λίαν ἄσχολος/οι


Explanation:
I chose a future less vivid conditional, which means that the speaker thinks that the condition is only possible, instead of probable. There are variant endings for singular and plural verbs. The adjective ἄσχολος is both masculine and feminine, so the endings work for both genders.

Dominic Galante
United States
Local time: 17:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas
56 days
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