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spirit

Hebrew translation: ru'akh

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:spirit
Hebrew translation:ru'akh
Entered by: John Kinory
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

22:06 Jan 21, 2002
English to Hebrew translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: spirit
something spiritual
a characteristic which someone can have
Rebecca
ru'akh
Explanation:
ru'akh = spirit, the immaterial part of a human being. It is also used to denode a completely immaterial being, a spirit that exists without a body.

rukhani = spiritual (m. singular)
rukhanit = spiritual (f. singulal)
+rukhaniyim (m. pl.), rukhaniyot (f. pl.)

RU'akh = resh-vav-khet
רוח

rukhaNI = resh-vav-khet-nun-yod
רוחני

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Note added at 2002-01-21 23:42:56 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ru\'akh is also used for mind in some contexts (in others, Hebrew uses \'sekhel). The distinction between spirit and soul, reflected in those Hebrew terms, is that \'soul\' is the seat of morality and character/personality. \'Spirit\' is the inanimate force that is also called the principle of life: it is not involved in the moral faculty.
Note also that ru\'akh also means wind, a force of nature that is essentially invisible. In English this is reflected in using the term \'spirit\' for alcohol, an invisible force that gives power to liquids.

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Note added at 2002-01-21 23:51:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Someone who is spirited is called az-ru\'akh (having a strong spirit).
The spirit of the law is \'ru\'akh ha\'khok\'.
Selected response from:

John Kinory
Local time: 03:16
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4ru'akhJohn Kinory
5neshamah/ru'ach/nefesh
Michal Circolone
5 -1neshama/ofiDana Cohen


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
neshama/ofi


Explanation:
THere are various possibilities to translate spirit with reference to someone's character. Some are:
neshama (literally =soul)
ofi (literally = character)

The first, I'd use for someone who is very very kind and good hearted. The second fits when describing someone who is high-spirited. Without further context, I can't be more accurate,
although there are more possibilities.


Dana Cohen
Israel
Local time: 05:16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  John Kinory: Neshama, as you say, is 'soul': not the same as spirit. Ofi/character is also not spirit.
1 hr
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
neshamah/ru'ach/nefesh


Explanation:
Hi Rebecca,
Spirit is translated as
Nefesh (nun peih shin, נפש) or Ru'ach (reish vav kheit, רוח), when you refer to a person's soul, mind.

Source: Oxford English-Hebrew Dictionary (and I'm a native speaker)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-22 16:08:21 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As I\'ve mentioned earlier spirit can be translated as either nefesh or RU\'ACH. I also added that it\'s in regards to one\'s Soul, mind. Alcalay Hebrew-English Dictionary suggests neshama (which is the same as nefesh) as a second option for spirit, right after Ruach. It is sometimes appropriate to use nefesh/neshama in regards to spirit. nefesh khayah can be translated as either spirit or living soul (in that order, taken from Alcalay Hebrew-English Dictionary).
:-)


    Reference: http://www.babylon.com
Michal Circolone
United States
Local time: 20:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in pair: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Suzan
3 mins
  -> Thanks! :-)

disagree  John Kinory: nefesh/neshama mean soul: not the same as spirit.
1 hr

neutral  Sue Goldian: I agree with you about ru'ach but not about nefesh
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
ru'akh


Explanation:
ru'akh = spirit, the immaterial part of a human being. It is also used to denode a completely immaterial being, a spirit that exists without a body.

rukhani = spiritual (m. singular)
rukhanit = spiritual (f. singulal)
+rukhaniyim (m. pl.), rukhaniyot (f. pl.)

RU'akh = resh-vav-khet
רוח

rukhaNI = resh-vav-khet-nun-yod
רוחני

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-21 23:42:56 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ru\'akh is also used for mind in some contexts (in others, Hebrew uses \'sekhel). The distinction between spirit and soul, reflected in those Hebrew terms, is that \'soul\' is the seat of morality and character/personality. \'Spirit\' is the inanimate force that is also called the principle of life: it is not involved in the moral faculty.
Note also that ru\'akh also means wind, a force of nature that is essentially invisible. In English this is reflected in using the term \'spirit\' for alcohol, an invisible force that gives power to liquids.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-21 23:51:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Someone who is spirited is called az-ru\'akh (having a strong spirit).
The spirit of the law is \'ru\'akh ha\'khok\'.

John Kinory
Local time: 03:16
PRO pts in pair: 43
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sue Goldian
6 mins
  -> Thanks :-)

agree  Suzan
10 mins
  -> Thanks :-)

agree  Simon Charass: "ru'akh" is correct, "denode" is "denote".
1 hr
  -> Oops, sorry for the typo (I can spell, but can't type, apparently!). Thanks :-)

agree  Rachel Gruenberger-Elbaz
6 hrs
  -> Thanks:-)
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