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oh my gosh

Hebrew translation: Elokim adirim

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:oh my gosh
Hebrew translation:Elokim adirim
Entered by: David Swidler
Options:
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22:41 Jan 26, 2004
English to Hebrew translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: oh my gosh
common phrase for a Russian Jew expressing fear or concern
Deanna
Elokim adirim
Explanation:
"Oh my gosh" is a way of avoiding the word "God," which at one time was considered improper to use in everyday speech (it has nothing to do with Russian- they obviously picked it up from English speakers).
So, too, "elokim" is a way of avoiding saying "elohim," which is considered a name of God. "Elohim adirim" is a common Hebrew interjection meaning "dear God!" No one says "elokim adirim," but I hereby introduce it into the language.
Selected response from:

David Swidler
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2Elokim adirim
David Swidler
5Alelay
Eynat
5 -1Oi vei
xxxAlex Zelkind
5 -1Oivaoiy
Mireia Ferrus


  

Answers


38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Alelay


Explanation:
Not quite sure what 'Russian Jew' has to do with it. Some of them speak Hebrew, some don't (and I don't speak Russian).

As far as Hebrew is concerned, you can have:

1. Alelay -
אללי
Very literary/archaic.

2. Elohim -
אלוהים
(i.e. God)

3. Vay lee -
ויי לי
rather low register

4. Avoy (or: avoy lee) -
אבוי
or
אבוי לי
again, rather literary these days.

I am sure there's more.

Eynat
PRO pts in pair: 80

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sue Goldian: BION, alelay seems to be making a comeback, at least among ninth graders in Gan Yavne.
9 hrs
  -> LOL. Thanks.

neutral  AMik99: it's not a common phrase for Russian Jew
22 hrs
  -> Which one? I offered FOUR.

disagree  xxxAlex Zelkind: If you're not sure - don't respond with 100% confidence level. Look below
3 days 10 hrs
  -> I am 100% sure about the Hebrew: I am a native Hebrew speaker. Are you? And once again, you are abusing the Disagree function.
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Elokim adirim


Explanation:
"Oh my gosh" is a way of avoiding the word "God," which at one time was considered improper to use in everyday speech (it has nothing to do with Russian- they obviously picked it up from English speakers).
So, too, "elokim" is a way of avoiding saying "elohim," which is considered a name of God. "Elohim adirim" is a common Hebrew interjection meaning "dear God!" No one says "elokim adirim," but I hereby introduce it into the language.

David Swidler
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxAlex Zelkind
23 mins

agree  xxxalonra
1 hr

neutral  Sue Goldian: Your translation's fine. However, people do say "oh my gosh" in English, so I really think what's needed here is something that people do say in Hebrew. And I also don't see what Russians have to do with it.
2 hrs

disagree  Eynat: You can't 'hereby introduce it into the language'. Nobody says it, therefore it is not an answer to the question asked.
6 hrs
  -> Sure you can. That's how language develops. How do you think Eliezer Ben Yehuda spent his time?

neutral  AMik99: never heard these kind expressions in community of russian jews in Israel ;-) They ordinary use some Russian expressions, btw very common in Hebrew.
16 hrs

agree  Pnina: The Megiddo Modern English-Hebrew Dictionary agrees with you. I know people who exclaim: Elokim adirim!
2 days 9 hrs
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Oivaoiy


Explanation:
Oivaoiy

Mireia Ferrus
Local time: 02:02
Native speaker of: Native in CatalanCatalan, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Eynat: No such thing.
2 hrs

disagree  Sue Goldian: Agree with Eynat
2 hrs

agree  xxxAlex Zelkind: Oi-vei
3 days 13 mins
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3 days 11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Oi vei


Explanation:
I'm a Russian Jew.
That's how we say it, altough this is not "pure" Hebrew :)

xxxAlex Zelkind
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Eynat: Once again, you are abusing the Disagree function: can you point to anything wrong with my suggestions? Your suggestion is not pure Hebrew nor impure Hebrew; it's not Hebrew at all but Yiddish. Are you a native Hebrew speaker? I am.
3 hrs
  -> Whenever people don't have arguments they say what you do: "I'm a native speaker. Are you?"
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