KudoZ home » English to Italian » Art/Literary

Italian Name

Italian translation: Letizia

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Italian Name for a Girl
Italian translation:Letizia
Entered by: Roomy Naqvy
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

21:59 Sep 25, 2001
English to Italian translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: Italian Name
I'm working on a short story and need a common/commonly found name for a girl character that has the sound and the feel of a young girl with a sunshine smile on her lips. It could be a real name or an adjective that means the same.

Thanks a lot.
Roomy Naqvy
India
Local time: 02:20
Letizia
Explanation:
I will add my suggestion to this very interesting list. I don`t know how you are going to choose, Roomy.

Laetitia is the Latin word for joy, and it also conveys a sense of serene enjoyment, natural wisdom in the appreciation of all that is beautiful.

I had a friend, as a girl, whose name kept the Latin spelling Laetitia, but it would be more current and up to date to spell it
Letizia.

all the best

paola l m
Selected response from:

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 15:50
Grading comment
I think all the replies to this wonderful question were equally delightful. I particularly liked Laura, short and sweet. Ilara sounded nice too. And Floriana gave connotations of something with flowers. I am sure I would love to use all the three above somewhere in future. Gaia might be pretty good; but as a phonetic sound, it is a new one for me at this moment. I wanted a two to three syllable name. And I am sure I might like to choose Allegra in future for it has a nice ring.

I am using Letizia here because the girl character, I had in mind, I wanted to give her something of a classical variation. So, I could give that feeling/sense of delight as well as that colour of something classical.

As an afterthought, I have known names like Serena and Stella and never found them too delightful ever. Just a personal choice.

But isn't it very interesting that I should be thinking of a short story and trying to implement it after my visit to Italy for the ProZ Convention. I came to Italy for the first time ever in my life and I seemed to be so enthusiastic about all my impressions there that I have found my lost creativity.

That's all I can say to all my Italian friends who responded here. Well, if you folks don't mind KudoZ and the occasional interference from me, I would be glad to ask questions on similar lines in future.

Best wishes

Roomy F Naqvy
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +1Gaia or Stella
Gilda Manara
4 +1Letizia
CLS Lexi-tech
4 +1IlariaRaffaella Cornacchini
4 +1Gioia
Floriana
4Dorinda
Rita Bandinelli
4Allegra
Nicola (Mr.) Nobili
4AlbaLapegna
4Solaria
Francesco D'Alessandro
3 +1LauraFrauke Joris
4Serena
Giovanna Graziani
4Stella
Laura Gentili
1Chiaralauradeb


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Laura


Explanation:
Is the name of a young singer of popular songs (Laura Pasotti); and the name of a young girl in a famous song (Laura dov'è?). I think it could suite.
ciao, Frauke

Frauke Joris
Italy
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Giovanna Graziani: it's Laura Pausini, not Pasotti!
2 hrs
  -> Aargh! Mi sa che Laura Pasotti è su Langit!!!!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Gaia or Stella


Explanation:
they are both widely used in Italy and very nice...


    native Italian translator
Gilda Manara
Italy
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 1038

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daniela Benigni: I think Gaia is perfect. Ciao Roomy!
36 mins

agree  Nicola (Mr.) Nobili: "Gaia" sounds better to me...
9 hrs

disagree  Alex Seidanis: Gaia sounds nice, but it's the Greek word for "Earth". Nothing about a young girl or sunshine...
1 day 6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Gioia


Explanation:
Literally "Joy" (but I like "Joy" too).

Floriana

PS: Well "Floriana" too, not that I think about it!!!

Floriana
United States
Local time: 14:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 792

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  anusca: maybe the better from the point of view of the sound
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Ilaria


Explanation:
It is a common name, it has a very sweet sound and, like Gaia, a very nice meaning linked to peace and happiness.
raffa1

Raffaella Cornacchini
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 1754

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gianfranco: I like this name (I have a niece called Ilaria)
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Stella


Explanation:
Someone suggested Stella and I love it.
Stella means star and it makes me think of light, radiance, shine.
If this is the meaning you are trying to convey, I would use Stella.
I also like Ilaria, but it's a less common, more sophisticated, name.

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 4999
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Solaria


Explanation:
from "sole" (the sun) and "solare" (sunny)

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 20:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 1056
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Chiara


Explanation:
It is a quite common Italian name. It means "fair" and gives me the idea of someone young, "fair" and smiling. I think it should do.

lauradeb
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Serena


Explanation:
It's quiet a common name and means serene, i.e. quiet and happy at the same time.

Just another alternative!

Ciao Roomy!

Giovanna Graziani
Italy
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 1119
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Alba


Explanation:
And what about "Alba", which means "sunrise"? It reminds me of light and serenity...

Ciao!


Lapegna
Local time: 21:50
PRO pts in pair: 108
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Letizia


Explanation:
I will add my suggestion to this very interesting list. I don`t know how you are going to choose, Roomy.

Laetitia is the Latin word for joy, and it also conveys a sense of serene enjoyment, natural wisdom in the appreciation of all that is beautiful.

I had a friend, as a girl, whose name kept the Latin spelling Laetitia, but it would be more current and up to date to spell it
Letizia.

all the best

paola l m


CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 15:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 2228
Grading comment
I think all the replies to this wonderful question were equally delightful. I particularly liked Laura, short and sweet. Ilara sounded nice too. And Floriana gave connotations of something with flowers. I am sure I would love to use all the three above somewhere in future. Gaia might be pretty good; but as a phonetic sound, it is a new one for me at this moment. I wanted a two to three syllable name. And I am sure I might like to choose Allegra in future for it has a nice ring.

I am using Letizia here because the girl character, I had in mind, I wanted to give her something of a classical variation. So, I could give that feeling/sense of delight as well as that colour of something classical.

As an afterthought, I have known names like Serena and Stella and never found them too delightful ever. Just a personal choice.

But isn't it very interesting that I should be thinking of a short story and trying to implement it after my visit to Italy for the ProZ Convention. I came to Italy for the first time ever in my life and I seemed to be so enthusiastic about all my impressions there that I have found my lost creativity.

That's all I can say to all my Italian friends who responded here. Well, if you folks don't mind KudoZ and the occasional interference from me, I would be glad to ask questions on similar lines in future.

Best wishes

Roomy F Naqvy

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Laura Gentili: I knew a girl called Letizia. She was sad all the time, so her friends changed her name in Mestizia.
21 mins
  -> how sad, and what a great pun!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Dorinda


Explanation:
I like the sound, that evokes something "golden" and cheerful. And I had a friend once with this name who was really like that.
If Ilaria had not been suggested, however, maybe my first choice would have been this.
Bye.

Rita Bandinelli
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 265
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Allegra


Explanation:
Just another alternative (the ones above sound beautiful to me). "Allegra" means "merry", "joyful", is not too common, but sounds appropriate if the name is supposed to be "metaphoric". Incidentally, in the recent movie called "Hannibal", the wife of the Italian policeman who eventually dies quite horribly, a beautiful and ever-smiling woman, is called "Allegra" (the actress, Francesca Neri, is definitely perfect for that role and name...).

Nicola (Mr.) Nobili
Italy
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 116
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search