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Lump of coal

Italian translation: it's a food craving

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21:52 Jan 2, 2003
English to Italian translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Lump of coal
La trad letterale è "pezzo di carbone". Quali origini ha il fatto che in Inghilterra lo mangino le donne incinta?
Lupa
Italian translation:it's a food craving
Explanation:
Perhaps the most reason is that pregnant women may develop a food craving for coal:

"If you develop a passing fancy for coal or chalk, resist the craving and award yourself a more sensible food treat"

http://www.babyworld.co.uk/information/pregnancy/pregnancypr...

"The common myths surrounding food desires are individually and culturally determined. Among rural Southern American women, the most common food cravings include clay, laundry starch, or pica, while British women commonly crave coal."

http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic3238.htm

Don't ask me why British women should crave coal, maybe it's just because they once had it easily to hand as it was used to heat the home, but it sounds like this could be the answer you were looking for.


A less likely alternative may be due to its similarity with charcoal, which has digestive properties
and thus helps symptoms common during pregnancy, such as heartbearn and nausea.
Charcoal is widely available in tablet form today, but it's NOT the same thing as coal. I can't imagine anyone eating it thinking that it would be beneficial. I think the confusion here is due to the fact that both are called carbone in Italian. Charcoal is carbone di legna/carbonella, whilst coal is carbone, as extracted from the ground. Both are forms of carbon, but medicines contain charcoal and not coal. And the confusion about the similarity of the 2 words would not arise amongst native English speakers.

http://www.angelfire.com/journal2/chronicpainforum/archivesp...



HTH

Sarah


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Note added at 2003-01-03 07:06:58 (GMT)
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scusami, la mia risposta doveva incominciare: the most likely reason

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-03 07:13:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"A condition in which you crave for inedible stuff like coal, soap etc. is called pica and may be due to a nutritional deficiency. It needs to be reported to the doctor or midwife just in case the substance you are craving for is poisonous.\"

http://www.mothersbliss.co.uk/nine/concerns/probc.asp


\"Dietary changes in pregnancy with aversion for certain foods eg. Coffee, alcohol, and fried food are very common as are cravings for certain foods. Mechanisms for these changes are poorly understood. PICA which is craving for ingestion of
non food products eg. Chalk, coal, soil or others is also reasonably common.\"

http://www.angelfire.com/80s/emed/pregnancy_clinic2.htm
Selected response from:

Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 19:18
Grading comment
Grazie mille buon lavoro!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3SERVONO A SGONFIARE LO STOMACO PERCHE' IL CARBONE HA LA PROPRIETA' DI ASSORBIRE I GAS
Michele Galuppo
4it's a food craving
Sarah Ponting
4vs
theangel


  

Answers


30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
vs


Explanation:
credo contro il vomito

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-03 07:29:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ossia, contro la nausea

theangel
Italy
Local time: 19:18
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 98
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
SERVONO A SGONFIARE LO STOMACO PERCHE' IL CARBONE HA LA PROPRIETA' DI ASSORBIRE I GAS


Explanation:
SERVONO A SGONFIARE LO STOMACO PERCHE'IL CARBONE HA LA PROPRIETA' DI ASSORBIRE I GAS.

Michele Galuppo
Italy
Local time: 19:18
Native speaker of: Italian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marco Oberto: Esistono anche qui in forma di pastiglie in vendita nelle farmacie.
46 mins

agree  Giusi Pasi
1 hr

agree  Amy Williams: yes - although I don't know too many people who eat it!
1 hr

neutral  Sarah Ponting: that's charcoal in English, not coal
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
it's a food craving


Explanation:
Perhaps the most reason is that pregnant women may develop a food craving for coal:

"If you develop a passing fancy for coal or chalk, resist the craving and award yourself a more sensible food treat"

http://www.babyworld.co.uk/information/pregnancy/pregnancypr...

"The common myths surrounding food desires are individually and culturally determined. Among rural Southern American women, the most common food cravings include clay, laundry starch, or pica, while British women commonly crave coal."

http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic3238.htm

Don't ask me why British women should crave coal, maybe it's just because they once had it easily to hand as it was used to heat the home, but it sounds like this could be the answer you were looking for.


A less likely alternative may be due to its similarity with charcoal, which has digestive properties
and thus helps symptoms common during pregnancy, such as heartbearn and nausea.
Charcoal is widely available in tablet form today, but it's NOT the same thing as coal. I can't imagine anyone eating it thinking that it would be beneficial. I think the confusion here is due to the fact that both are called carbone in Italian. Charcoal is carbone di legna/carbonella, whilst coal is carbone, as extracted from the ground. Both are forms of carbon, but medicines contain charcoal and not coal. And the confusion about the similarity of the 2 words would not arise amongst native English speakers.

http://www.angelfire.com/journal2/chronicpainforum/archivesp...



HTH

Sarah


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-03 07:06:58 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

scusami, la mia risposta doveva incominciare: the most likely reason

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-03 07:13:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"A condition in which you crave for inedible stuff like coal, soap etc. is called pica and may be due to a nutritional deficiency. It needs to be reported to the doctor or midwife just in case the substance you are craving for is poisonous.\"

http://www.mothersbliss.co.uk/nine/concerns/probc.asp


\"Dietary changes in pregnancy with aversion for certain foods eg. Coffee, alcohol, and fried food are very common as are cravings for certain foods. Mechanisms for these changes are poorly understood. PICA which is craving for ingestion of
non food products eg. Chalk, coal, soil or others is also reasonably common.\"

http://www.angelfire.com/80s/emed/pregnancy_clinic2.htm


Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 19:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1150
Grading comment
Grazie mille buon lavoro!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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