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I live my life.

Japanese translation: 人生充実

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:live life to the full
Japanese translation:人生充実
Entered by: Timothy Takemoto
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04:31 Dec 27, 2001
English to Japanese translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: I live my life.
I recently posted this and got several responses for a meaning stressing my independence. while this will now be tattooed on my left shoulder I'm looking for a different meaning of the phrase for my right shoulder. I'm looking for a translation meaning I live my life to the fullest. the other translation ended up being "dokuritu dokuho". so in english you would stress the "I" so state this. what I'm looking for now would be a phrase that would stress "live". also, I need it to be in chinese characters. preferably four characters to be even with the other translation.
keggersdad
人生充実
Explanation:
"Jinsei ouka" is pretty good. It is not a four character saying in itself but it made up of
"jinsei" = life or rather lifetime (jin =human, sei = life)

and

"ouka" = "sing in praise of" or "enjoy" (ou = advocate or shout out, ka = song)
It is used in the somewhat standard expression "seishun wo ouka suru" which
means enjoying / singing the praises or youth.

So this is "in praise and enjoyment of our lifetime" or "singing life's praise" or even "enjoying life to the full". Not bad at all if you ask me.

It does not include any suggestion of living "now", or "today", as in "carpe diem" = "sieze the day", but then perhaps that is not necessary, since you do not mention "now." (except in your mail to me).

When someone asked about "carpe diem" before the winning answer was "ima wo
ikiru" which means "live (the) now." This was was the Japanese title of the
Robin Williams film "Dead Poets Society." But this contains Hiragana and does not seem at all tattoo-ish.

If you are going to use the dokuritudokuho then I would stick to a four Chinese character word-phrase.

I searched for alternatives yesterday in an online four character dictionary (at
http://www.kotowaza-world.com/h_yoji/
in case you know anyone Japanese) but I could not find anything appropriate with the word "life."

The solution above (jinseiouka) gets around this by creating a new four character word. It is a bit difficult to be too sure about a new word.

Another possible neoligism is the more obvious jinsei juujitsu = enrich life
("juujitsu" = to enrich, to be or make meaty and full, made of the character "ju" for "fill" or "full" and the character for "really" or "truth")

"jujitsu shita jinsei" is a common expression for "full life" and "jinsei wo jujitsu suru" is a common expression for "living life to the full".

The solution above (iinsei ouka) is more poetic using a metaphor (singing) and contains more complex characters ("ou"), whereas, jinseijujitsu is a contraction of a very common expression.

Here they both are -

http://www.mii.kurume-u.ac.jp/~leuers/jinseijujitu.gif

The one above is more...esoteric. To be honest, I needed to look it up! So you could choose whichever you think more attractive, or wait for other peoples solutions and comments?

Selected response from:

Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 19:30
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1人生謳歌(jinsei ohka)Yukari Davies
4人生納得mimichan
2 +1人生充実
Timothy Takemoto


  

Answers


50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
人生謳歌(jinsei ohka)


Explanation:
This is my best guess. "Jinsei" means "life" and "Ohka" means "fully enjoy something".

Yukari Davies

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mimichan: If pleasure is one of the most important thing in life
6 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
人生充実


Explanation:
"Jinsei ouka" is pretty good. It is not a four character saying in itself but it made up of
"jinsei" = life or rather lifetime (jin =human, sei = life)

and

"ouka" = "sing in praise of" or "enjoy" (ou = advocate or shout out, ka = song)
It is used in the somewhat standard expression "seishun wo ouka suru" which
means enjoying / singing the praises or youth.

So this is "in praise and enjoyment of our lifetime" or "singing life's praise" or even "enjoying life to the full". Not bad at all if you ask me.

It does not include any suggestion of living "now", or "today", as in "carpe diem" = "sieze the day", but then perhaps that is not necessary, since you do not mention "now." (except in your mail to me).

When someone asked about "carpe diem" before the winning answer was "ima wo
ikiru" which means "live (the) now." This was was the Japanese title of the
Robin Williams film "Dead Poets Society." But this contains Hiragana and does not seem at all tattoo-ish.

If you are going to use the dokuritudokuho then I would stick to a four Chinese character word-phrase.

I searched for alternatives yesterday in an online four character dictionary (at
http://www.kotowaza-world.com/h_yoji/
in case you know anyone Japanese) but I could not find anything appropriate with the word "life."

The solution above (jinseiouka) gets around this by creating a new four character word. It is a bit difficult to be too sure about a new word.

Another possible neoligism is the more obvious jinsei juujitsu = enrich life
("juujitsu" = to enrich, to be or make meaty and full, made of the character "ju" for "fill" or "full" and the character for "really" or "truth")

"jujitsu shita jinsei" is a common expression for "full life" and "jinsei wo jujitsu suru" is a common expression for "living life to the full".

The solution above (iinsei ouka) is more poetic using a metaphor (singing) and contains more complex characters ("ou"), whereas, jinseijujitsu is a contraction of a very common expression.

Here they both are -

http://www.mii.kurume-u.ac.jp/~leuers/jinseijujitu.gif

The one above is more...esoteric. To be honest, I needed to look it up! So you could choose whichever you think more attractive, or wait for other peoples solutions and comments?




    Reference: http://www.kotowaza-world.com/h_yoji/
Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 19:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 121

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mimichan
1 hr
  -> Thanks, but I wonder how "jinseijuujitsu" compares with jinseiouka?
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
人生納得


Explanation:
人生=life
納得=reasonable, makes sense

To put it in a nutshell, 人生納得 would mean a life that person likes in a sense that it is reasonable and things makes sense.
When these two words are combined, they are often used as ”納得のいく人生”  人生納得 is not in and of itself a four character word but people use 人生納得 as much as 人生充実 in casual conversation . Sometimes the word appears as a four character word in advertisements or in books (as a title) as much as 人生充実 does.
In a sense, 納得 has a broad meaning and can encompass a life of joy, a full life or any kind of life whatever that person wishes to have or likes.
One might have a lot of joy in his life but his life may not be full. Even if there is a person who likes a life with a lot of joy but does not care too much whether it is full or not, as long as he likes the way he is living and things make sense to him 納得 would still be applicable. I don't know whether this is a good example but there is a person who was sleeping almost all day for a year and sometimes playing around when (s)he was awake even though (s)he believed to be healthy and apparently was and explicitly said that his/her life was not full but everything made sense to him/her and (s)he enjoyed that year. For that person, 人生納得 was apparently applicable to his/her life.
On the contrary, there was another person who didn't care so much for a life filled with joy but was happy having a life filled with a lot of workload which compelled him to work 19 hours a day. He said he liked the way how his life was full and the word 人生納得 applied to his case?

Sorry to make it too long.
I just wanted to provide you with an alternative in case this might be something you are looking for.

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Note added at 2001-12-27 15:19:39 (GMT)
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If pleasure is important I would recommend 人生謳歌 as Yukari has suggested.
If a full life is what you wish to have and you would like to, for example, achieve things, be focused in your life, accumulate a lot of experience in your life, and make your life challenging, I would suggest take Timothy¥'s 人生充実.
If you want things to make sense in your life whatever your life would look like, I would say how about 人生納得. If you think the meaning of the one I suggested iis too broad, and you are for instance, adamant about not making any compromise at all in your life, you might not want to take mine.

mimichan
Local time: 05:30
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Timothy Takemoto: Very philosophical & there is a chance that this is what K'sdad is looking for, but it does not seem to be a translation of living "life to the full" since, conversely one might lead a an un-full life, but still nattoku if one felt one had no choice..
58 mins
  -> True, 納得 can also encompass what you have mentioned. The meaning of 納得 seems to be a bit broad.
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