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gotcha

Japanese translation: (kuchi-hodo demo nai na.)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:gotcha
Japanese translation:(kuchi-hodo demo nai na.)
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18:57 Jan 2, 2002
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / conversation
English term or phrase: gotcha
I have the advantage over you. You have been found not to know as much as you think you do. You should not boast.
david isaacson
口ほどでもないな。(kuchi-hodo demo nai na.)
Explanation:
This is my best guess. "kuchi" means "mouth" or "words". "hodo" means "as much as", "demo nai" is a negative marker, "na" adds some emphasis. As you know, the subject of the sentence is omitted.
Selected response from:

Yukari Davies
Grading comment
This is the best of the responses because the other responses did not transcribe the Japanese letters into English, therefore making it impossible for me to pass the answer on to the person who asked the question of me, who also doesn't read Japanese. Thank you very much.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1(そんなの)バレバレだよ/見え見えだよ/バレてるよmimichan
4 +2ざまあみろ Zamaamiro!
Timothy Takemoto
4 +2口ほどでもないな。(kuchi-hodo demo nai na.)Yukari Davies


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
口ほどでもないな。(kuchi-hodo demo nai na.)


Explanation:
This is my best guess. "kuchi" means "mouth" or "words". "hodo" means "as much as", "demo nai" is a negative marker, "na" adds some emphasis. As you know, the subject of the sentence is omitted.

Yukari Davies
Grading comment
This is the best of the responses because the other responses did not transcribe the Japanese letters into English, therefore making it impossible for me to pass the answer on to the person who asked the question of me, who also doesn't read Japanese. Thank you very much.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Shiho Nakamura
1 day 3 hrs

agree  Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.): Good but to 'strong" in Japanese expression. It is impolite to use.
1 day 7 hrs
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
ざまあみろ Zamaamiro!


Explanation:
Zamaa miro!

The translation given at the alc online dictionary is "look at your self," but it is translated as "gotcha" at the web site below.

It is used when you get the upper hand on people. It could be when it becomes clear that someone has been "shooting their mouth off' (which is closer to the meaning of the above), but it could be "gotcha" in the sense that someone has been beaten at something else, or when then simply have not been able to do something.

Zamaamiro is ruder than the suggestion above, and gotcha, so it should be used with friends. I think that coming from a non-Japanese speaker it is only likely to be seen as cute but if you looked like you spoke Japanese, and you said it to a someone you did not know then that person might well take offence.

Etemologically, I think, "Zama" is from "bu-zama" meaning (bad-appearance) and Miro means look. Literally then this is "Just take a lot at yourself/your (bad) appearance"

Zamaamiro is also given as a translation for "You asked for it (and you got it)" at
http://www.h3.dion.ne.jp/~tango2/S/12.html
and for "KICK YOUR ASS!!" (think that should be "Kicked your ass") here
http://www.bigmouthjpn.com/Warped00.html



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Note added at 2002-01-03 04:46:47 (GMT)
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Zama Miro! is translated as \"Serves you Right\" here and a couple of other places on the net
http://ftp.se.kde.org/pub/comics/anime-manga/rec.arts.anime....

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Note added at 2002-01-03 14:16:31 (GMT)
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Thinking about it, this would have to be said as joke even to friends, since it is rather rude, unlike \"gotcha\".

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Note added at 2002-01-08 07:29:24 (GMT) Post-grading
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\"This is the best of the responses because the other responses did not transcribe the Japanese letters into English\"
Hmm... I am afraid I don\'t understand. I wrote the answer in English characters and explained the breakdown of the word.


    Reference: http://www.flash.net/~gkawano/web/mi.cd.reviews/mi.sour.j-li...
Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 18:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mimichan: I'm glad that you suggested this one to a guy if the asker's parents did not name their daughter David.
1 hr
  -> Yes, "Zamaamiro!" is definately boy-language. By the way, your answer is all moji-bake. My *guess* is that David is the gentleman here http://www.wmich.edu/library/prof/issacson.html

agree  TranslationsRus: I think the original 'gotcha' is meant to be interpreted as arrogant and rude.
2 days 15 hrs
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(そんなの)バレバレだよ/見え見えだよ/バレてるよ


Explanation:
I can think of three options right now.
They are read as:(son nano) bare bare dayo/ mie mie dayo/ bareteru yo. You can either put or omit the word in the parenthesis. Son nano which is in the parenthesis means something like "that's".
バレバレだよ"bare bare dayo"=literally means its so obvious
見え見えだよ"Mie Mie dayo"= literally means I can read you easily
バレてるよ"bareteru yo"=literally means it's obvious
These expressions are mostly used among friends.
I would suggest these three options especially if someone has caught the snake in the grass, If you want to say gotcha in Japanese, make sure you say it in a friendly tone. It would be good to be cheerful or be laughing when you are saying that.


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Note added at 2002-01-03 06:13:48 (GMT)
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Both boys and girls can use these expressions.


    Daily conversation
mimichan
Local time: 04:43
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Timothy Takemoto: Good for the "you've been found out side of things" and more polite than mine.
25 mins
  -> Your answer is funnier though. By the way, thank you for letting me know about the moji-bake twice today...that was really funny too!
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