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A tear dropped from the professor's eye.

Japanese translation: 教授の目から涙がこぼれた

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:A tear dropped from the professor's eye.
Japanese translation:教授の目から涙がこぼれた
Entered by: tappi_k
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23:06 Oct 20, 2004
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: A tear dropped from the professor's eye.
Hello,

I was wondering how you would say 'A tear dropped from the professor's eye' in Japanese? I will need the translation in Roman letters (Romaji) also. In a Korean translation I saw of this sentence the word 'tear' is in the honorific case because it is a professor's tear. The professor is a respected professional and therefore is usually referred to in the honorific tense. Is there an honorific in the Japaense translation too? Thanks very much for any help and information about this. Also, even though I can only vote for one answer, I appreciate everyone's answers.

Sincerely,

Brian Costello

Seattle, Wa.
Brian Costello
教授の目から涙がこぼれた
Explanation:
and in Romanji:
Kyoju no me kara namida ga koboreta.

and to answer your question, it is possible to employ the honorific form (rather than the honorific 'tense' in case of the Japanese language) for things belonging to someone of higher authority, yet for this sentence it would be rather unusual/silly/bad taste. i am not very fluent in Korean so i couldn't comment professionally on the difference between employment of this form/tense between Korean and Japanese but in any case in Japanese the choice (of whether or not to use honorific form) is a quite subtle one. hope this helps.
Selected response from:

tappi_k
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:42
Grading comment
Dear Kyoko,

Thank you very much for your translation. The Korean translation actually puts the verb 'dropped' in the honorific so I messed up a little bit there. However, you did a good job of translating the sentence and saying something about honorific usage in Japanese.

Sincerely,

Brian Costello

Seattle, Wa.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1教授の目から涙がこぼれた
tappi_k
4Kyoju-no me-kara namida-ga koboreta
Takako Whilden
4kyoujyu no me kara namida ga ochita
nyasue


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a tear dropped from the professor's eye.
kyoujyu no me kara namida ga ochita


Explanation:
kyoujyu - professor
no - of
me - eyes
kara - from
namida - tears
ga - post-positional article
ochita - dropped (past tense)

nyasue
United States
Local time: 22:42
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a tear dropped from the professor's eye.
Kyoju-no me-kara namida-ga koboreta


Explanation:
"dropped"usually means "Ochita" in Japanese, but in this case, I think "koboreta" which means "spilled", "overflowed" out of eyes, or "flowed" will do better.


Takako Whilden
Local time: 12:42
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
a tear dropped from the professor's eye.
教授の目から涙がこぼれた


Explanation:
and in Romanji:
Kyoju no me kara namida ga koboreta.

and to answer your question, it is possible to employ the honorific form (rather than the honorific 'tense' in case of the Japanese language) for things belonging to someone of higher authority, yet for this sentence it would be rather unusual/silly/bad taste. i am not very fluent in Korean so i couldn't comment professionally on the difference between employment of this form/tense between Korean and Japanese but in any case in Japanese the choice (of whether or not to use honorific form) is a quite subtle one. hope this helps.

tappi_k
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Dear Kyoko,

Thank you very much for your translation. The Korean translation actually puts the verb 'dropped' in the honorific so I messed up a little bit there. However, you did a good job of translating the sentence and saying something about honorific usage in Japanese.

Sincerely,

Brian Costello

Seattle, Wa.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
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