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19:12 Nov 7, 2001
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: goodbye
how do you say goodbye in japanese
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Summary of answers provided
5 +1"sayonara", "bai-bai", "matane" "jyane"
LEXICON KK
4 +1sayonaraYukari Davies
5Sayonaramimichan
3Sayonara,Dewa mata,Mata aai mashopreeti_k


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sayonara


Explanation:
"Sayonara" is a rather formal word. "Bai-bai!" is often used by teenagers.


Yukari Davies

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mimichan: I think you also want to say "bai bai" is something like "Bye!" in English.
4 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"sayonara", "bai-bai", "matane" "jyane"


Explanation:
These are the four most used terms for saying "goodbye" in Japanese. Sayonara is very formal, and the other three are used more often in casual conversations.

LEXICON KK
Local time: 11:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  J_R_Tuladhar: "sayonara" has the meaning of "adieu". "matane" & "jyane" is used when you'll be meeting your friend soon.
9 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Sayonara


Explanation:
"Sayonara"is the word to use when one leaves and is a rather formal way to say good-bye.

When a telephone operator says "good-bye" to a customer because of bad connection or something, they say "Osore irimasuga mouichido okakenaoshi kudasai," the translation of which is "Sorry, please call again." in this kind of situation, we don't say "sayonara."

When you want to say good-bye to someone olderthan yourself or superior to yourself on the phone upon hanging up, the word for good-bye would be "shitsurei shimasu."

Just for clarification, "Bai-bai" is bye. "jya- ne" is something close to "bye". "Matane" is closer to "see you later" although it is an informal way to say it.


mimichan
Local time: 21:48
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 16
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5 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Sayonara,Dewa mata,Mata aai masho


Explanation:
さようなら :-'Sayonara' means 'Good bye' in a formal way.

でわまた :- 'Dewa mata' means 'See you again' in slightly formal way.

またあいましょ :- 'Mata aai masho' means 'Let us meet again' in a informal way.

preeti_k
Local time: 08:18
Native speaker of: Native in MarathiMarathi, Native in HindiHindi
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