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i love you

Japanese translation: _______ daisuki!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:i love you
Japanese translation:_______ daisuki!
Entered by: mimichan
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

12:50 Jan 28, 2002
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: i love you
I love you.
Mouk
_______ daisuki!
Explanation:
What would be the right translation for "I love you" would depend on who you say it to.

Daisuki = I love you. This is something people usually say to someone in the family or good friends.

If you want to say it to someone in your family, just combine the word that means mom, dad...etc and "daisuki"
Okaasan(=Mom) daisuki! = I love you (Mom)
If you want to say I love you to someone else in the family, just replace the words dad, big brother, big sister... etc with mom.
Otousan(=Dad)/Oniichan(=big brother)/Oneechan(=big sister)/Obaachan(grandmother)/Ojiichan(grandfather) "daisuki!"

To a cousin, little sister, little brother, or friends, combine the name of the person and "daisuki": ______ (Name of the person comes inside the blank) daisuki! The name of a person's fiance can also come inside the blank too.

If a person wants to tell a person (she is in love with in a letter,
" ____ (name of the person) no koto ga suki desu."

The translation given by the other answeres are not a mistake at all and are standard translation but it might be good to know that they are not originally a Japanese thing but something literature and movies etc adopted when Japan came into contact with the West.
However, men did say "Kimi ni horeta" or "Kimi ni horeterunda" to women when they loved someone became aggressive. Otherwise Japanese people have uasually said things indirectly to imply to the other person that they loved the other person or said things in a way that the other person would sense it.
Selected response from:

mimichan
Local time: 06:15
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2_______ daisuki!mimichan
4"Kimi ga sukida", "Anata ga sukida" or "Anata wo aishiteimasu"Serge L


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
"Kimi ga sukida", "Anata ga sukida" or "Anata wo aishiteimasu"


Explanation:
HTH,

Serge L.


    ProZ glossaries
Serge L
Local time: 12:15
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
_______ daisuki!


Explanation:
What would be the right translation for "I love you" would depend on who you say it to.

Daisuki = I love you. This is something people usually say to someone in the family or good friends.

If you want to say it to someone in your family, just combine the word that means mom, dad...etc and "daisuki"
Okaasan(=Mom) daisuki! = I love you (Mom)
If you want to say I love you to someone else in the family, just replace the words dad, big brother, big sister... etc with mom.
Otousan(=Dad)/Oniichan(=big brother)/Oneechan(=big sister)/Obaachan(grandmother)/Ojiichan(grandfather) "daisuki!"

To a cousin, little sister, little brother, or friends, combine the name of the person and "daisuki": ______ (Name of the person comes inside the blank) daisuki! The name of a person's fiance can also come inside the blank too.

If a person wants to tell a person (she is in love with in a letter,
" ____ (name of the person) no koto ga suki desu."

The translation given by the other answeres are not a mistake at all and are standard translation but it might be good to know that they are not originally a Japanese thing but something literature and movies etc adopted when Japan came into contact with the West.
However, men did say "Kimi ni horeta" or "Kimi ni horeterunda" to women when they loved someone became aggressive. Otherwise Japanese people have uasually said things indirectly to imply to the other person that they loved the other person or said things in a way that the other person would sense it.


mimichan
Local time: 06:15
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  myonson
11 hrs
  -> Thank you for agreeing with me. I find it more important to write what I believe to be true and to give the asker options rather than take it merely as a competition thing.

agree  Eva Blanar
4 days
  -> Thank you for agreeing with me for the same reason as I wrote above your name.
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