KudoZ home » English to Japanese » Other

good luck

Japanese translation: umaku ikimasu yo ni (うまくいきますように)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
21:45 Jun 4, 2001
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: good luck
wishing good things for you
come
Japanese translation:umaku ikimasu yo ni (うまくいきますように)
Explanation:
The above phrase would be suitable for someone who is about to take a test, for example.
Selected response from:

Chihiro Tsuchida
Local time: 20:59
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naGanbatte ne! or Ganbatte Kudasai!
Timothy Takemoto
nakou-un wo inoruJ_R_Tuladhar
naumaku ikimasu yo ni (うまくいきますように)
Chihiro Tsuchida


  

Answers


4 hrs
umaku ikimasu yo ni (うまくいきますように)


Explanation:
The above phrase would be suitable for someone who is about to take a test, for example.

Chihiro Tsuchida
Local time: 20:59
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Henry Dotterer: May be right, depending on context, but literally, this is closer to "hope things go well."
5 hrs

DPS: THIS is the right translation!!!
18 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs
kou-un wo inoru


Explanation:
This is the Japanese equivalent of
Good Luck.
More politely, kou-un wo inorimasu.
written 幸運を祈る.

This phrase literally means "I pray for good luck".

Hope this helps,

Jina Tuladhar.


    Kenkyusha's J>E Dic.
J_R_Tuladhar
Local time: 02:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in NepaliNepali
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Henry Dotterer: Perfect for a greeting card.
24 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 hrs
Ganbatte ne! or Ganbatte Kudasai!


Explanation:
The other translations are good literal translations and should be used if you want to keep with the literal meaning: the wish that someone has good luck.

But in situations where Westerners say "Good Luck," such as on parting, or before an exam, or before some sort of trial or tribulation, or at the end of an email, the Japanese would be incined to say

Very INformally "Ganbatte ne" or "Ganbatte"

Politely "Ganbatte Kudasai"

Which means "Give it your best shot!"

So if you want to sound natural, then use this translation, but if you want wish luck specifically, then use the translations above.

You might also consider

"Ganbarimashou" which means "let's give it (things in general from now on) our best shot". I used this in a parting greeting to a woman once, cornily enough.




    10 years in Japan
Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 05:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 121
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search