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Id

Japanese translation: Ido, Are

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Id
Japanese translation:Ido, Are
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17:20 Jun 9, 2001
English to Japanese translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: Id
In Freudian theory, the division of the psyche that is totally unconscious and serves as the source of instinctual impulses and demands for immediate satisfaction of primitive needs.
Fei
"are" or in Japanese script あれ
Explanation:
I know my field too, trust me.

Nevins and Kei above are right: "id" is normally translated as "イド" or "ido," which is Japanese a phonetisation of the Strachey's Latinization of Freud's "Das es" (into the Latin for "it").

But as you know, Strachey's translation of Freud's "Das es", "ich", and "uber-ich" have been criticised by many psychoanalytic thinkers such as Bettelheim (see reference below).

Now, due to the long history of their use, and lack of some ofthe German connotations, I am not suggesting that we should go back to a literal "It", "I" and "over-I" in English. But when putting Freud into Japanese, where the acceptance and understanding of Freud's ideas are greatly reduced, a Japanese rendering closer to the original German should also be considered.

In my lectures on Freudian psychoanalysis in Japanese, I use both "ido" and the Japanese word "are" which means (according to Kenkyuusha's Japanese - English dictionary ) "that," "it," "they," "those."

While it does not do to equate the "unconscious" with the "Id", if one may suggest that there is a level of overlap between them, then "are" has advantages when attempting to explain the latter term. "Are" is often used to replace words for (1) sex organs (2) words that cannot be brought to mind, and (3) other words that are repressed or taboo.

For example

"Are da ne" - "oh it's like that isn't it. " or "its, that thingy isn't it" when reffering to something that cannot or should not be brought to mind. This use is extremely common.

"Are wo sawatte" - "touch it," "touch me down there."

"Are" "that!" and expression of surprise at something unexpected.


In my lectures I ask students to come up with some of the things that they have reffered to as "are" and related these to the "it" (are) to the mass of unconscious drives that Freud refers to as "Das es."

So, I repeat, the answer given by Nevin and Kei (in Japanese イド or "id"), is the correct, authordox translation, but "are" is my recommended supplementary translation if you want to make yourself understood to a Japanese audience who may not have heard of the "Ido" at all.

Ego is "Ego" (or "jiga") and the super ego is
エゴ・イド(自我)・スーパーエゴ
Selected response from:

Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 10:09
Grading comment
Thanks greatly. Your answer was composed of the sophisticated way and a way to say it without sophistication.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na"are" or in Japanese script あれ
Timothy Takemoto
naIdo; pronounces "eado"Kei
naイドNoriko Nevins
naKan
Amy Kasuga


  

Answers


1 hr
Kan


Explanation:
"Kan" is the direct equivalent of instinct. So I'm going to suggest that it's pretty close to the meaning that you're looking for or the closest thing you can get in Japanese without going into a lot of psychiatric vocabulary which probably wouldn't be understood by someone not in that field.


    Six years in Japan
Amy Kasuga
United States
Local time: 20:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 11
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1 hr
イド


Explanation:
イド has been the most widely used translation for "id" in Japan. The other 2 divisions of the psyche are "エゴ(自我)" and "スーパーエゴ(超自我)".


    medical dictionaries and other numerous sources including a popular SF writer Yasutaka Tsutsui's works
Noriko Nevins
United States
Local time: 18:09
PRO pts in pair: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
cubby: yes
5 hrs
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7 hrs
Ido; pronounces "eado"


Explanation:
I know my field, trust me.
This is how you say Id in Japanese.
It's still Id, but say it in Japanese way. "Eado" or "eedoe", if trying to pronounce it in Japanese. You write "Ido" .


    Native Japanese, with psychology / psychotherapy background.
Kei
United States
Local time: 17:09
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8 hrs
"are" or in Japanese script あれ


Explanation:
I know my field too, trust me.

Nevins and Kei above are right: "id" is normally translated as "イド" or "ido," which is Japanese a phonetisation of the Strachey's Latinization of Freud's "Das es" (into the Latin for "it").

But as you know, Strachey's translation of Freud's "Das es", "ich", and "uber-ich" have been criticised by many psychoanalytic thinkers such as Bettelheim (see reference below).

Now, due to the long history of their use, and lack of some ofthe German connotations, I am not suggesting that we should go back to a literal "It", "I" and "over-I" in English. But when putting Freud into Japanese, where the acceptance and understanding of Freud's ideas are greatly reduced, a Japanese rendering closer to the original German should also be considered.

In my lectures on Freudian psychoanalysis in Japanese, I use both "ido" and the Japanese word "are" which means (according to Kenkyuusha's Japanese - English dictionary ) "that," "it," "they," "those."

While it does not do to equate the "unconscious" with the "Id", if one may suggest that there is a level of overlap between them, then "are" has advantages when attempting to explain the latter term. "Are" is often used to replace words for (1) sex organs (2) words that cannot be brought to mind, and (3) other words that are repressed or taboo.

For example

"Are da ne" - "oh it's like that isn't it. " or "its, that thingy isn't it" when reffering to something that cannot or should not be brought to mind. This use is extremely common.

"Are wo sawatte" - "touch it," "touch me down there."

"Are" "that!" and expression of surprise at something unexpected.


In my lectures I ask students to come up with some of the things that they have reffered to as "are" and related these to the "it" (are) to the mass of unconscious drives that Freud refers to as "Das es."

So, I repeat, the answer given by Nevin and Kei (in Japanese イド or "id"), is the correct, authordox translation, but "are" is my recommended supplementary translation if you want to make yourself understood to a Japanese audience who may not have heard of the "Ido" at all.

Ego is "Ego" (or "jiga") and the super ego is
エゴ・イド(自我)・スーパーエゴ


    Reference: http://www.nytimes.com/books/00/06/25/specials/kermode-bette...
Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 10:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 121
Grading comment
Thanks greatly. Your answer was composed of the sophisticated way and a way to say it without sophistication.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Gunsou
13 hrs

ProZ.com Staff: Informative, but you risk a loss of sophistication; "are" is like "that thing(y)"
1 day 5 hrs

Kei: "are" does not inform enough of what id is
1 day 19 hrs
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