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what do you want from me?

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10:11 Jun 21, 2001
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: what do you want from me?
what do you want from me?
alex
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Summary of answers provided
na +1Boku ni naniwo shite hoshiino?Kei
naWatashi-kara nani ga hosii desu ka?J_R_Tuladhar
nawatashi kara doo itta mono wo nozonde imasuka?ProZ.com Staff


  

Answers


6 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Boku ni naniwo shite hoshiino?


Explanation:
「僕に何をしてほしいの?」
This is a great free-translation phrase, because Japanese don't say "what do you want from me?".
First of all, there are options for "me". Depending on who's talking, it'll be the followings:
Boku (僕、ぼく)= I, male voice (youthful, but many old guys also say Boku)
Ore (俺、おれ)= I, more masculine male voice
Watashi (私、わたし)= I, usually female voice (but can be male in a formal setting)
Please replace Boku with the appropriate "I" accordingly.

My answer translates: What do you want me to do?

When we say, "What do you want from me?"in English, it implies that the other person is wanting something from us, either subjective property (e.g., honesty and love) or act (e.g., come home early). Thus, its meaning is, usually, "what do you want me to do?"

However, if you are really thinking that the other person is wanting a materialistic property from you (money?), then you might say:
"Boku no nani ga hoshii no?"
「僕の何が欲しいの?」
This also works for subjective property, but it's a bit pushing it. It might sound a bit sexual too, since its literal translation is "My what do you want?":)

Good luck


    a native japanese
Kei
United States
Local time: 17:09

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Timothy Takemoto: Excellent, and for my money, better than those below.
7 days
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8 hrs
watashi kara doo itta mono wo nozonde imasuka?


Explanation:
This gets around the sexual connotation that the previous answerer alluded to because it is formal. It can be used politely, but it is formal enough that depending on the situation, it could be used somewhat sarcastically...like your phrase in English.

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 17:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Kei: polite, maybe too polite
1 day 19 hrs
  -> true
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1 day 3 hrs
Watashi-kara nani ga hosii desu ka?


Explanation:
This is matching translation of the above sentence.

watashi私= the most common form for "I",
can be used by both male and
female speakers. A male could
use "boku"僕 instead of "watashi".

karaから=from
nani何=what
gaが=grammatical particle
hosii desu kaほしいですか= want
This is written:
私(僕)から何がほしいですか。in Japanese.  

Hope this helps.
Jina Tuladhar



    This is everyday Japanese.
J_R_Tuladhar
Local time: 06:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in NepaliNepali
PRO pts in pair: 14
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