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rolling year

Japanese translation: See explanation

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18:26 Sep 13, 2001
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: rolling year
UK employment-related documents. e.g "Sickness entitlement is calculated on a rolling year basis."
"Rolling year" seem to mean "the previous 52 weeks"
Junji
Japanese translation:See explanation
Explanation:
"Rolling year" does mean "the previous 52 weeks." The number of sick days allowed (if any) is determined somehow by looking at the previous 52 weeks.

That being said, I'm having a hard time imagining how the past 52 weeks (continually changing) can affect the number of sick days allowed. I am familiar with a system in which unused sick days can "roll" over to the next year. In such a case the number of sick days entitled each year may be affected. For example, during my first year at a company I may get 10 sick days. If I don't use them, they may roll over to my next year, where I would get the annual 10 days plus the rolled-over 10 days: 20 days total. 20 days may be the maximum limit. So if I don't use them, then for my 3rd year I wouldn't get the annual 10 sick days. I would only get the rolled-over 20 sick days.

I'm not sure if that's what they mean in this case, but rolling year means "the previous 52 weeks" (the period continually changing each day).

I'm not sure of the official Japanese term. I know of 移動平均法, the method of moving averages, which is a method used to appraise stocks on a rolling year (or rolling fixed time period) basis. Perhaps the term includes 移動?

Something like 病休日数は(移動年制?移動年度?)によって計算されています。

Japanese isn't my native language so that's probably not appropriate, but I hope this helps to at least confirm the meaning of "rolling year."
Selected response from:

Philip Soldini
Local time: 04:25
Grading comment
Thank you very much, Mr. Soldini. Your suggestion really helps me to know that "ido^-nen-kei" (total for a rolling year??) etc. is quite often used in the field of business administration. And in the context of sickness entitlement in the Human resource system I guess, sickness entitlement (days) depends on the past 52 weeks (almost 1 year) before the current day as follows: let's assume that, see, an employee is given 10 sickness absence days per a "rolling year." If he only took 7 days off last October in the past 52 days, he can be absent 3 days more in this September; but he will be absent 10 days in the next October. Anyway, for the confirmation, I will continue to try to contact with my clients, who are developing the enterprise software system. Thank you, again. Regards, Junji Izumi
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3See explanation
Philip Soldini


  

Answers


1 day 2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
See explanation


Explanation:
"Rolling year" does mean "the previous 52 weeks." The number of sick days allowed (if any) is determined somehow by looking at the previous 52 weeks.

That being said, I'm having a hard time imagining how the past 52 weeks (continually changing) can affect the number of sick days allowed. I am familiar with a system in which unused sick days can "roll" over to the next year. In such a case the number of sick days entitled each year may be affected. For example, during my first year at a company I may get 10 sick days. If I don't use them, they may roll over to my next year, where I would get the annual 10 days plus the rolled-over 10 days: 20 days total. 20 days may be the maximum limit. So if I don't use them, then for my 3rd year I wouldn't get the annual 10 sick days. I would only get the rolled-over 20 sick days.

I'm not sure if that's what they mean in this case, but rolling year means "the previous 52 weeks" (the period continually changing each day).

I'm not sure of the official Japanese term. I know of 移動平均法, the method of moving averages, which is a method used to appraise stocks on a rolling year (or rolling fixed time period) basis. Perhaps the term includes 移動?

Something like 病休日数は(移動年制?移動年度?)によって計算されています。

Japanese isn't my native language so that's probably not appropriate, but I hope this helps to at least confirm the meaning of "rolling year."

Philip Soldini
Local time: 04:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 29
Grading comment
Thank you very much, Mr. Soldini. Your suggestion really helps me to know that "ido^-nen-kei" (total for a rolling year??) etc. is quite often used in the field of business administration. And in the context of sickness entitlement in the Human resource system I guess, sickness entitlement (days) depends on the past 52 weeks (almost 1 year) before the current day as follows: let's assume that, see, an employee is given 10 sickness absence days per a "rolling year." If he only took 7 days off last October in the past 52 days, he can be absent 3 days more in this September; but he will be absent 10 days in the next October. Anyway, for the confirmation, I will continue to try to contact with my clients, who are developing the enterprise software system. Thank you, again. Regards, Junji Izumi
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