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don't let the bastards wear you down

Latin translation: illegitimis non carborundum :-)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:don't let the bastards wear you down
Latin translation:illegitimis non carborundum :-)
Entered by: Chris Rowson
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00:13 Oct 18, 2002
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: don't let the bastards wear you down
carving above a door in rome
don
illegitimis non carborundum
Explanation:
This is not really Latin - it is a joke dating probably from the Second World War, where some learned gentleman has made up something that appears to be Latin, and indeed to call on classical references such as Cato´s catchphrase "Carthago delendum est".

"Illegitimis" was not used in this way in classical Latin, but is not completely out of order. It is with "carborundum", though, that the perpetrator has really let loose. The construction with "-um" appears to be very idiomatic Latin, a gerundive, but is derived from a verb that never existed.

For a joke-on-a-joke, see my second reference, but don´t believe a word of it

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Note added at 2002-10-18 01:16:40 (GMT)
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I could try to put it into real Latin, but I like it best in this form.

A literal back translation of the psudo-Latin would be \"To the illegitimates be it not permitted to grind you down\".

Carborundum is actually a material used for grinding. \"Silicon carbide is extremely rare as a naturally occurring mineral. In fact, the only known natural source of silicon carbide is meteorites. When it was first discovered, natural silicon carbide was named moissanite after its discoverer, French chemist Henri Moissan.

At about the same time that Moissan found silicon carbide in meteorites, an American engineer learned how to fuse sand and carbon in an electric arc furnace to make the exact same compound. Edward Acheson didn’t initially know what he had made, but he found out immediately how hard it was, recognized its commercial value, and named his discovery carborundum. Today, we know this material very well as the abrasive used to make grinding wheels and discs. As a man-made abrasive material, carborundum is extremely plentiful and inexpensive. Technically, the mineral that is carborundum is named moissanite.\"
(http://www.lapidary.org/Education/moissanite_info.htm)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-19 03:57:55 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Cato of course remembered that Carthage was linguistically feminine, so he actually said \'Carthago delenda est\' (about a million times).
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 06:04
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1illegitimis non carborundumChris Rowson
5noli sinere nothos te exedere/nolite sinere nothos vos exedere
Joseph Brazauskas
4Noli nothis permittere te terereRowan Morrell


  

Answers


36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Noli nothis permittere te terere


Explanation:
This is how you say it in Latin, according to the site below.

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Note added at 2002-10-18 00:50:51 (GMT)
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About 14 other sites also say this.


    Reference: http://www.guernsey.net/~jim/latine.html
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 16:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
illegitimis non carborundum


Explanation:
This is not really Latin - it is a joke dating probably from the Second World War, where some learned gentleman has made up something that appears to be Latin, and indeed to call on classical references such as Cato´s catchphrase "Carthago delendum est".

"Illegitimis" was not used in this way in classical Latin, but is not completely out of order. It is with "carborundum", though, that the perpetrator has really let loose. The construction with "-um" appears to be very idiomatic Latin, a gerundive, but is derived from a verb that never existed.

For a joke-on-a-joke, see my second reference, but don´t believe a word of it

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-18 01:16:40 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I could try to put it into real Latin, but I like it best in this form.

A literal back translation of the psudo-Latin would be \"To the illegitimates be it not permitted to grind you down\".

Carborundum is actually a material used for grinding. \"Silicon carbide is extremely rare as a naturally occurring mineral. In fact, the only known natural source of silicon carbide is meteorites. When it was first discovered, natural silicon carbide was named moissanite after its discoverer, French chemist Henri Moissan.

At about the same time that Moissan found silicon carbide in meteorites, an American engineer learned how to fuse sand and carbon in an electric arc furnace to make the exact same compound. Edward Acheson didn’t initially know what he had made, but he found out immediately how hard it was, recognized its commercial value, and named his discovery carborundum. Today, we know this material very well as the abrasive used to make grinding wheels and discs. As a man-made abrasive material, carborundum is extremely plentiful and inexpensive. Technically, the mineral that is carborundum is named moissanite.\"
(http://www.lapidary.org/Education/moissanite_info.htm)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-19 03:57:55 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Cato of course remembered that Carthage was linguistically feminine, so he actually said \'Carthago delenda est\' (about a million times).


    Reference: http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=158343&keyword=carborundum
    Reference: http://www.ku.edu/history/index/europe/ancient_rome/E/Gazett...
Chris Rowson
Local time: 06:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marion Burns: This is the usual version.
35 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
noli sinere nothos te exedere/nolite sinere nothos vos exedere


Explanation:
The former sngular, the later plural.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 367
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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