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black knight

Latin translation: eques nigris armis amictus

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:black knight
Latin translation:eques nigris armis amictus
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas
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07:51 Oct 29, 2002
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: black knight
A knight wearing black armor. As in the story about the Black Knight.
Jason Shenton
eques nigris armis amictus
Explanation:
Lit., 'knight clad in [shining] black armour (arms)'. 'Niger' refers to things like pitch, storm clouds, ivy leaves, and darkling forests, and 'nigris armis' would imply that the knight's armour is shiny and new; 'ater' is used of dull black things like bread, coal, night, etc., and 'atris armis' would imply that his armour is old and has a dull black hue, lacking any sheen.

You could say 'eques niger' or 'eques ater', I suppose, but the latter at least would have conjured up in a Roman's mind the related adjective 'atratus', which literally means 'blackened, clad in black clothes (or armour)', but usually means 'in mourning' because the garments which the Romans wore at funerals and in mourning were, as they (usually) remain today, black in colour.

In regard to which adjective you choose, I guess what it boils down to is whether you conceive of the knight's armour as new or old. The construction is:

eques (subject nominative) +
nigris armis (instrumental ablative) + amictus (perfect passive participle).
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
My interpretation was 'eques ater', however, you have made an excellent point that this could be interpreted as 'just clothed in black'. Thank you for your excellent input.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1eques aterChris Rowson
5eques nigris armis amictus
Joseph Brazauskas
4miles ater
Marion Burns


  

Answers


55 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
eques ater


Explanation:
There are various choices for black, but I think this is the one here. It implies, not that he is a black man, but that he is clothed in black, or is "dark, gloomy, sad".

Chris Rowson
Local time: 20:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fernando Muela
35 mins
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
miles ater


Explanation:
"Miles" (soldier) is the Medieval Latin word for knight. I would use it here since the Black Knight is a medieval motif, very common in the literature and art of this period.

Marion Burns
United States
Local time: 14:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
eques nigris armis amictus


Explanation:
Lit., 'knight clad in [shining] black armour (arms)'. 'Niger' refers to things like pitch, storm clouds, ivy leaves, and darkling forests, and 'nigris armis' would imply that the knight's armour is shiny and new; 'ater' is used of dull black things like bread, coal, night, etc., and 'atris armis' would imply that his armour is old and has a dull black hue, lacking any sheen.

You could say 'eques niger' or 'eques ater', I suppose, but the latter at least would have conjured up in a Roman's mind the related adjective 'atratus', which literally means 'blackened, clad in black clothes (or armour)', but usually means 'in mourning' because the garments which the Romans wore at funerals and in mourning were, as they (usually) remain today, black in colour.

In regard to which adjective you choose, I guess what it boils down to is whether you conceive of the knight's armour as new or old. The construction is:

eques (subject nominative) +
nigris armis (instrumental ablative) + amictus (perfect passive participle).

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 367
Grading comment
My interpretation was 'eques ater', however, you have made an excellent point that this could be interpreted as 'just clothed in black'. Thank you for your excellent input.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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