KudoZ home » English to Latin » Art/Literary

There are no children who love me

Latin translation: Non sunt liberi me diligentes.

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
12:42 Mar 21, 2001
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: There are no children who love me
The phrase (a motto):
"There are no children who love me."
David Ebert
Latin translation:Non sunt liberi me diligentes.
Explanation:
One could use a a participle, NON SUNT LIBERI ME DILIGENTES, or else a relative pronoun, NON SUNT LIBERI QUI ME DILIGUNT. Most Latin mottoes are as compact as possible, so the first option is really preferable.

Latin requires the verb SUNT to be at the beginning of a sentence to present the meaning "There are". This contrasts with the much more common verb-final position, which does not assert general existence and merely means "(children) are". NON cannot follow its verb, so the two-word phrase NON SUNT must come first in this sentence.

The most common word for "children" is LIBERI, which has no singular. (The word PUERI normally means "boys", as opposed to PUELLAE, "girls".)

The verb AMO, AMARE, often hints at sexual love, probably not what you want here. Furthermore, the contrast -- between what children normally do and what the motto laments -- also calls for a word that denotes happy enjoyment and perhaps also respect. That option is DILIGO, DILIGERE.

Selected response from:

Wigtil
Grading comment
ALL of the responses were most appreciated. While the second from wigtil was definitive the first was most well documented.

I am humbled that such as these have shared with me. Thank you for your assistance.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naMinor correction to secondary option: "Non sunt liberi qui me diligant."Wigtil
naNon sunt liberi me diligentes.Wigtil
naPueri qui me amant non sunt.Robert Jackson


  

Answers


1 hr
Pueri qui me amant non sunt.


Explanation:
What a sad "motto"! ... but, anyway, this is how it would be in Latin.


Professional linguist/translator/interpreter.
BA Berkeley
3 yrs. college Latin

Robert Jackson
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 hrs
Non sunt liberi me diligentes.


Explanation:
One could use a a participle, NON SUNT LIBERI ME DILIGENTES, or else a relative pronoun, NON SUNT LIBERI QUI ME DILIGUNT. Most Latin mottoes are as compact as possible, so the first option is really preferable.

Latin requires the verb SUNT to be at the beginning of a sentence to present the meaning "There are". This contrasts with the much more common verb-final position, which does not assert general existence and merely means "(children) are". NON cannot follow its verb, so the two-word phrase NON SUNT must come first in this sentence.

The most common word for "children" is LIBERI, which has no singular. (The word PUERI normally means "boys", as opposed to PUELLAE, "girls".)

The verb AMO, AMARE, often hints at sexual love, probably not what you want here. Furthermore, the contrast -- between what children normally do and what the motto laments -- also calls for a word that denotes happy enjoyment and perhaps also respect. That option is DILIGO, DILIGERE.




    Ph. D. in ancient Greek, college instructor of Latin, Greek, and other languages.
Wigtil
PRO pts in pair: 11
Grading comment
ALL of the responses were most appreciated. While the second from wigtil was definitive the first was most well documented.

I am humbled that such as these have shared with me. Thank you for your assistance.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 hrs
Minor correction to secondary option: "Non sunt liberi qui me diligant."


Explanation:
Just a minor correction to the second, less preferable option that I mentioned previously. It is better as:
NON SUNT LIBERI QUI ME DILIGANT.
Note the change is spelling of the last word.

This uses the subjunctive form of DILIGO, DILIGERE, which is grammaticallly more appropriate to the non-existence assertion.




    As before.
Wigtil
PRO pts in pair: 11
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search