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Greetings

Latin translation: salutem (dicimus)

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16:33 Feb 14, 2008
English to Latin translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy / back translation of diploma composed in Latin
English term or phrase: Greetings
Hi, I translate a diploma from English which was initially composed in Latin. Can't figure out meaning our some words and expressions, I think, it's owing to the influence of the translation. Could you please help "restore" it and (if needed) propose an alternative translation?


THE SENATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW

***Greetings***

We hereby notify all that the University of Glasgow created and declared its alumnus

John Doe

Master of Arts with Second Class Honours, after he successfully ....
Vitali Stanisheuski
Belarus
Local time: 03:02
Latin translation:salutem (dicimus)
Explanation:
Since you got the scanned diploma, "Salutem" - literally "good ealth"and in Christian times "salvation, redemption" - is a very common way of greeting, especially in letters and epistles, with the verb "dicere" = "say", understated and it is commonly followed by the dative of the person / people greeted.
Eg. Seneca Lucilio suo salutem! = Seneca greets his dear Lucilius

In a diploma it could be translated: "We, the Senate of this University, salute / greet / welcome"

HIH!
Selected response from:

Leonardo Marcello Pignataro
Local time: 02:02
Grading comment
Thank you all very much !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Salvetemiaowoo
5salutem (dicimus)Leonardo Marcello Pignataro
3 +1AVE
jokie


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
greetings
AVE


Explanation:
If I remember is AVE.
" Ave Ceasar....."

jokie
Spain
Local time: 02:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Italian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas: This is one possibility.
7 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
greetings
Salvete


Explanation:
Salvete is plural. In Wheelock's Latin (6th ed.), in the end of each chapter, the writer greet the students with
Salvete, discipulae et discipuli or
Salve, amicae et amici
(female and male students/friends respectively)
and students may answer
Salve, magister/magistra. (pp. 8,23)

the two above translations are also greetings. However,
Salve is singular; and
Ave is also a latin greeting. But I think this is only appropriate for greeting higher authorities. Because as far as I know, there's only expressions such as Ave Ceasar or Ave Rabbi (from the Bible), Ave Maria, etc..

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Note added at 19小时 (2008-02-15 12:04:03 GMT)
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Sorry I made a wrong sentence. It should be
salvete, amicae et amici or
salve, amice

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Note added at 19小时 (2008-02-15 12:22:46 GMT)
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SALUTEM- I would greet you. -subjuctive mood
SALVETE - Be well! - imperative mood

Example sentence(s):
  • Salve, amicae et amici!
miaowoo
Native speaker of: Native in ChineseChinese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jokie: you are right. AVE is very formal, I translate in this way because it is a very important document. Bye
22 mins
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1 day2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
greetings
salutem (dicimus)


Explanation:
Since you got the scanned diploma, "Salutem" - literally "good ealth"and in Christian times "salvation, redemption" - is a very common way of greeting, especially in letters and epistles, with the verb "dicere" = "say", understated and it is commonly followed by the dative of the person / people greeted.
Eg. Seneca Lucilio suo salutem! = Seneca greets his dear Lucilius

In a diploma it could be translated: "We, the Senate of this University, salute / greet / welcome"

HIH!

Leonardo Marcello Pignataro
Local time: 02:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you all very much !
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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