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you are the man

Latin translation: Venis, vidis, vicis

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:You are the man!
Latin translation:Venis, vidis, vicis
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08:53 Oct 31, 2001
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: you are the man
to congratulate someone (male) on a job well done
r. powell
Venis, vidis, vicis
Explanation:

veni, vidi, vici. These words, which Suetonius tells us were carried on a banner in a triumphal procession of Julius Caesar (Divus Iulius 37), can serve as a starting-point for an analysis of rhetorical figures and sentence-construction. "I came, I saw, I conquered." Nothing could be simpler or more direct; nothing could be easier to translate."

On the basis of this famous sentence, I coined the above, which is simply in the second person: you came, you saw and you conquered.

best of luck

paola l m
Selected response from:

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 05:15
Grading comment
Thanks
My world history students (10th graders)are impressed at my "command" of Latin!

Rod Powell
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4Venis, vidis, vicis
CLS Lexi-tech
1 +1Ecce homo
Jack Doughty


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Ecce homo


Explanation:
This means "Behold the man", and is a fairly well-known Latin expresion, but I am not sure if it can be used in the sense to which you refer.


    -
Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  CLS Lexi-tech: Agree that it should not be used in this context. Used for Christ!
23 mins
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Venis, vidis, vicis


Explanation:

veni, vidi, vici. These words, which Suetonius tells us were carried on a banner in a triumphal procession of Julius Caesar (Divus Iulius 37), can serve as a starting-point for an analysis of rhetorical figures and sentence-construction. "I came, I saw, I conquered." Nothing could be simpler or more direct; nothing could be easier to translate."

On the basis of this famous sentence, I coined the above, which is simply in the second person: you came, you saw and you conquered.

best of luck

paola l m



    Reference: http://web.gc.cuny.edu/dept/class/rhetfig.htm
CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 05:15
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Thanks
My world history students (10th graders)are impressed at my "command" of Latin!

Rod Powell
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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