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Liberate Salvate tutame inferis

Latin translation: Liberate Salvate tutame inferis

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Liberate Salvate tutame inferis
Latin translation:Liberate Salvate tutame inferis
Entered by: Nicola (Mr.) Nobili
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11:40 Jan 7, 2002
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Liberate Salvate tutame inferis
Hi Ya !!

I am having this slight problem and I am wondering if you are able to help me !!! I have been searching the net to find a correct translation of an english sentence -- into Latin.

I watched a film called "Event Horizon" and in this film, a little bit of the Latin language is used. But recently I have discovered on the net - that the latin sentence used in this film was most likely wrong !!

So I am trying to find out what is the proper latin spelling and saying of this english sentence !!!!

HERE BELOW IS THE INFORMATION ON THIS SUPPOSED MESSED UP TRANSLATION IN THIS FILM
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Movie Title: Event Horizon - 1997
Nitpick Category: Translation
Approximate time of nitpick: 2/3 of the way through
Summary: Pretty poor Latin
Details: During the film two Latin phrases are used: 'Liberate me' and 'Liberate tutame ex inferis'. The first is translated as 'Save me', the second as 'Save yourselves from Hell'. Now, I admit it's some time since I did Latin and I couldn't find my Latin dictionary, but I think both translations are wrong. The first is 'Free me'; 'Save me' would be 'Salvate me'.

In the second 'ex inferis' means 'out of', as in 'You are in Hell, so get out of it', and I think the intended meaning was 'Get yourselves AWAY from Hell, before you get into it'. I think the second translation should be 'Salvate tutame inferis'.
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**** COULD YOU PLEASE TELL ME WHAT " 'Get yourselves AWAY from Hell, before you get into it "...........WOULD BE IN LATIN ???

*** Sorry to be a pain and I really appreciate your help a lot. Thank you so much,

Yours,
Patric, United Kingdom :)
Patric
No, it's correct
Explanation:
I think these two sentences are correct. I mean, you're projecting your English way of thinking unto Latin, which is ruled by another "logic". What is more, this is religious Latin, and since it is very close to religious Italian (Italian being my mother tongue), I daresay it sounds correct. I mean, you would say, in prayers and the alike "set me free" as a synonym of "save me", since you are saved if you are set free from the evil (incidentally, the Italian for "evil", "cattivo", derives from "captured", so the religious metaphor is indeed frequently found).
As for the second one, when there is a danger and you require help, in Latin you generally say "ex + the ablative case". The reason is a historic one: you defend (or save, or protect...) FROM an emeny who is marching towards you, it is a war metaphor which later on foxilised and was applied to a wide range of situations.
This is just an example of how translations should get the meaning and interpret source language metaphors properly, linguistic/grammatical knowledge alone is not enough.
Selected response from:

Nicola (Mr.) Nobili
Italy
Local time: 20:52
Grading comment
Hi there !!
Your translator is really very good - the translator went out of his way to help me. Thanks ever so much for your help !!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5No, it's correct
Nicola (Mr.) Nobili


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
No, it's correct


Explanation:
I think these two sentences are correct. I mean, you're projecting your English way of thinking unto Latin, which is ruled by another "logic". What is more, this is religious Latin, and since it is very close to religious Italian (Italian being my mother tongue), I daresay it sounds correct. I mean, you would say, in prayers and the alike "set me free" as a synonym of "save me", since you are saved if you are set free from the evil (incidentally, the Italian for "evil", "cattivo", derives from "captured", so the religious metaphor is indeed frequently found).
As for the second one, when there is a danger and you require help, in Latin you generally say "ex + the ablative case". The reason is a historic one: you defend (or save, or protect...) FROM an emeny who is marching towards you, it is a war metaphor which later on foxilised and was applied to a wide range of situations.
This is just an example of how translations should get the meaning and interpret source language metaphors properly, linguistic/grammatical knowledge alone is not enough.

Nicola (Mr.) Nobili
Italy
Local time: 20:52
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Grading comment
Hi there !!
Your translator is really very good - the translator went out of his way to help me. Thanks ever so much for your help !!
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