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sun

Latin translation: Sol.

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18:00 Oct 8, 2000
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: sun
a globe of gases in the universe that brings day to our planet.
sarah
Latin translation:Sol.
Explanation:
The word SOL, as all nouns in Latin, has several additional forms, according to its function in the sentence. So you might also encounter SOLIS, SOLI, SOLE, or SOLEM, for instance, in actual Latin texts.

The English word "solar" is a word derived centuries ago from the Latin word SOLARIS, which means "pertaining to the sun" or "solar". A "solarium" meant "sundial" or "sunporch" to the ancient Romans, and we've borrowed the latter meaning and modified it to mean "sun room" or "glass-encased sun garden". Our word "solstice" is borrowed from the Latin SOLSTITIUM, which means "the stopping of the sun." English has also developed several words from the ancient *Greek* word for "sun", which is HELIOS, including "helium" (the sun's second gas), "perihelion" (the orbital point closest to the sun), and "aphelion" (the most distant point from the sun of a sun-centered orbit), and "heliocentric".

Latin also has other words that somewhat resemble SOL.
1) SOLUM is the word for "earth" or "ground" or "floor" and is likely the ultimate source of the English words "soil" and "sully". The Latin adjective SOLIDUS (related to the noun SOLUM) has given us our words "solid" and, of all things, "soldier".
2) SOLUS is an adjective meaning "only" or "alone" and the source of English words like "solo" and "sole (=only)" and "solitude", among others.
3) SOLARI, a verb meaning "to console", is the origin of English "console" and "solace" and "inconsolable".
4) SOLEA, the name for a kind of ancient sandal, has yielded "sole (of a shoe)" and "sole (the flat fish)", two real oddities in this list!
5) SOLEO and SOLITUS are variant forms of a verb meaning "to usually/always (do)..." or "to be accustomed to...."
6) SOLVO and SOLUTUS are some of the forms of a verb meaning "to untie, to resolve, to pay", giving rise to English words like "solve, solution, resolute, dissolute," and so forth.
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Wigtil
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4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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naSol.Wigtil


  

Answers


13 hrs
Sol.


Explanation:
The word SOL, as all nouns in Latin, has several additional forms, according to its function in the sentence. So you might also encounter SOLIS, SOLI, SOLE, or SOLEM, for instance, in actual Latin texts.

The English word "solar" is a word derived centuries ago from the Latin word SOLARIS, which means "pertaining to the sun" or "solar". A "solarium" meant "sundial" or "sunporch" to the ancient Romans, and we've borrowed the latter meaning and modified it to mean "sun room" or "glass-encased sun garden". Our word "solstice" is borrowed from the Latin SOLSTITIUM, which means "the stopping of the sun." English has also developed several words from the ancient *Greek* word for "sun", which is HELIOS, including "helium" (the sun's second gas), "perihelion" (the orbital point closest to the sun), and "aphelion" (the most distant point from the sun of a sun-centered orbit), and "heliocentric".

Latin also has other words that somewhat resemble SOL.
1) SOLUM is the word for "earth" or "ground" or "floor" and is likely the ultimate source of the English words "soil" and "sully". The Latin adjective SOLIDUS (related to the noun SOLUM) has given us our words "solid" and, of all things, "soldier".
2) SOLUS is an adjective meaning "only" or "alone" and the source of English words like "solo" and "sole (=only)" and "solitude", among others.
3) SOLARI, a verb meaning "to console", is the origin of English "console" and "solace" and "inconsolable".
4) SOLEA, the name for a kind of ancient sandal, has yielded "sole (of a shoe)" and "sole (the flat fish)", two real oddities in this list!
5) SOLEO and SOLITUS are variant forms of a verb meaning "to usually/always (do)..." or "to be accustomed to...."
6) SOLVO and SOLUTUS are some of the forms of a verb meaning "to untie, to resolve, to pay", giving rise to English words like "solve, solution, resolute, dissolute," and so forth.

Wigtil
PRO pts in pair: 11
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