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leadership through service

Latin translation: qui servit, ducit.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:leadership through service
Latin translation:qui servit, ducit.
Entered by: David Wigtil
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15:50 Jun 4, 2002
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: leadership through service
motto for Scout leaders
Toby Comeaux
qui servit, ducit.
Explanation:
The expression "qui servit, ducit" literally means, "whoever serves, leads." The form QUI is in the masculine gender, but this is typical for mottoes and quips without specifying males only, since the masculine in such phrases is used to apply to anyone; the feminine equivalent would in fact constrain the sense to females only.

Latin very often uses simple, direct sentences to express ideals, rather than abstract nouns like "leadership" or "service." The nouns corresponding to these verbs generally go well beyond mere abstraction and imply something more concrete: SERVITIA really means "slavery" and cannot ever mean "service" in the modern sense; DUCATUS usually means "military command, authorization," and alternatives for it, like IMPERIUM or IUSSUM, are used for "orders, commands, missives", etc.

--Loquamur
Selected response from:

David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 14:07
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1qui servit, ducit.
David Wigtil


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
qui servit, ducit.


Explanation:
The expression "qui servit, ducit" literally means, "whoever serves, leads." The form QUI is in the masculine gender, but this is typical for mottoes and quips without specifying males only, since the masculine in such phrases is used to apply to anyone; the feminine equivalent would in fact constrain the sense to females only.

Latin very often uses simple, direct sentences to express ideals, rather than abstract nouns like "leadership" or "service." The nouns corresponding to these verbs generally go well beyond mere abstraction and imply something more concrete: SERVITIA really means "slavery" and cannot ever mean "service" in the modern sense; DUCATUS usually means "military command, authorization," and alternatives for it, like IMPERIUM or IUSSUM, are used for "orders, commands, missives", etc.

--Loquamur


David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 14:07
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 60

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
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