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Montreal

Latin translation: Mons Regalis

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Montreal
Latin translation:Mons Regalis
Entered by: Jonathan Widell
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09:43 May 4, 2003
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Montreal
Montreal, Quebec. The name in Latin. The seal of McGill University has "Monteregio". If that refers to Montreal, what would it be in the nominative?
Jonathan Widell
Canada
Local time: 13:37
Mons Regalis
Explanation:
'Montreal' means 'Mount Royal' in French, and this is 'Mons Regalis' (nominative) in Latin.

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Note added at 2003-05-05 06:52:37 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The city is built on the slopes of Mt.Royal (French \'Mont Real\'), afterwhich it is named. This could be \'Mons Regalis\' or \'Mons Regius\', whence the form \'Monteregio\', which the ablative form of \'Mons Regius\'.

Apparently \'Mons Regius. is the commoner name. But French \'real\' > Latin \'regalis\', not \'regius\'. \'Marianopolis\' would mean \'city of Marian(us)\'.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
This is tougher than I thought. But since I accepted Mons Regalis as the Latin translation of the French name (Montréal), I guess I have to accept it as the Latin translation of the English name too (Montreal). But I must admit there is something odd about Mons Regalis. I accept it as the translation of Mount Royal (or Mont Royal), but the fact is that the name of the city is Montreal, not Mount Royal.

Two things: First, "Monteregio" does exist (nominative or ablative), which would suggest the nominative is Mons Regius (not Regalis). Second, the region south of Montreal is called La Montérégie, which would suggest that Monteregio has been accepted as the (incorrect) nominative at some point. I mean, French and English received their Latin borrowings in the oblique cases (e.g. "nation" and not "natio").

This would explain the change of "Mount Royal" into "Montreal" as well. Yes, the L is there, which would allow us to trace it back to Regalis, but so is the T, which would point to "Monte". They could have left the T out and called it Monsreal or Monreal or Monreale, as in Sicily).

If my memory serves me correctly, the city was originally dedicated to Virgin Mary, so I wouldn't be surprised if the city was indeed called Marianopolis. I could live with the extra "n" (we do have Marianology...). But since the points can't be split between you two, I have to be nasty and remind you that Marianopolis is Greek, not Latin.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1Mons Regalis
Joseph Brazauskas
5 -1Monteregio, Marianopolis
Scott Horne


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Mons Regalis


Explanation:
'Montreal' means 'Mount Royal' in French, and this is 'Mons Regalis' (nominative) in Latin.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-05 06:52:37 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The city is built on the slopes of Mt.Royal (French \'Mont Real\'), afterwhich it is named. This could be \'Mons Regalis\' or \'Mons Regius\', whence the form \'Monteregio\', which the ablative form of \'Mons Regius\'.

Apparently \'Mons Regius. is the commoner name. But French \'real\' > Latin \'regalis\', not \'regius\'. \'Marianopolis\' would mean \'city of Marian(us)\'.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 367
Grading comment
This is tougher than I thought. But since I accepted Mons Regalis as the Latin translation of the French name (Montréal), I guess I have to accept it as the Latin translation of the English name too (Montreal). But I must admit there is something odd about Mons Regalis. I accept it as the translation of Mount Royal (or Mont Royal), but the fact is that the name of the city is Montreal, not Mount Royal.

Two things: First, "Monteregio" does exist (nominative or ablative), which would suggest the nominative is Mons Regius (not Regalis). Second, the region south of Montreal is called La Montérégie, which would suggest that Monteregio has been accepted as the (incorrect) nominative at some point. I mean, French and English received their Latin borrowings in the oblique cases (e.g. "nation" and not "natio").

This would explain the change of "Mount Royal" into "Montreal" as well. Yes, the L is there, which would allow us to trace it back to Regalis, but so is the T, which would point to "Monte". They could have left the T out and called it Monsreal or Monreal or Monreale, as in Sicily).

If my memory serves me correctly, the city was originally dedicated to Virgin Mary, so I wouldn't be surprised if the city was indeed called Marianopolis. I could live with the extra "n" (we do have Marianology...). But since the points can't be split between you two, I have to be nasty and remind you that Marianopolis is Greek, not Latin.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxIno66
1 hr
  -> Thanks.

agree  Giusi Pasi
1 hr
  -> Thanks.

disagree  Scott Horne: Standard Latin names exist: see below.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks for the information.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Monteregio, Marianopolis


Explanation:
The nominative is _Monteregio_.

Another established Latin name for Montréal is _Marianopolis_.



Scott Horne
Local time: 13:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Joseph Brazauskas: 'Monteregio' is the ablative, not the nominative form. The correct nominative form is 'Mons Regius'.
11 hrs
  -> You're right about _Mons Regius_/_Monteregio_; I wasn't paying attention. But the established Latin name for Montréal is _Marianopolis_.
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