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Seize the Seas

Latin translation: Cape maria. OR: Potiaris maribus/marium.

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12:59 May 3, 2001
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Seize the Seas
Latin Word/s for Sea, Ocean or Water
I want to name a boat.
RJ
Latin translation:Cape maria. OR: Potiaris maribus/marium.
Explanation:
CAPE MARIA. Take/seize the seas.
POTIARIS MARIBUS, or else, POTIARIS MARIUM. (May you) be master of the seas.

You would not want to use CARPE, which means "pluck, harvest", and d_o_e_s n_o_t mean "seize". This verb is in fact mistranslated (!) in the English version of the famous phrase, CARPE DIEM, which most people think means, "seize the day". It actually means something like, "enjoy the fruits of this day."

Selected response from:

Wigtil
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naCape maria. OR: Potiaris maribus/marium.Wigtil
nacarpe oceanum/oceanosCarole Reade-Kentros
namare/oceanus/aqua/undaCarole Reade-Kentros
naCarpe Oceanus
Vidmantas Stilius


  

Answers


22 mins
Carpe Oceanus


Explanation:
Quotable Quoditian Quotes
''Carpe Diem.'' (Seize the day.)
''Carpe Noctem.'' (Seize the night.)
''Carpe Toyota.'' (Seize the engine.)
''Carpe Carp.'' (Seize the fish.)
''Carpe Oceanus.'' (Seize the seas.)

I hope it helps.





    Reference: http://www.cusd.claremont.edu/~mrosenbl/all_quotes.html
Vidmantas Stilius
Local time: 05:46
Native speaker of: Native in LithuanianLithuanian
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Andrea Kopf
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22 mins
mare/oceanus/aqua/unda


Explanation:
sea = mare, -is
ocean = oceanus, -i
water = aqua, -ae
wave = unda, -ae

Carole Reade-Kentros
Local time: 05:46
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Andrea Kopf
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28 mins
carpe oceanum/oceanos


Explanation:
it cannot be "carpe oceanus"
it is either : "carpe oceanum" = seize the ocean (Accusative singular)
or : carpe oceanos = seize the oceans (Accusative plural)

Nominative singular = oceanus
Vocative sg = oceane
Accusative sg = oceanum
Genitive sg = oceani
Dative sg = oceani
Ablative sg = oceano

Nominative plural = oceani
Vocative plural = oceani
Accusative pl = oceanos
Genitive pl = oceanorum
Dative pl = oceanis
Ablative pl = oceanis














Carole Reade-Kentros
Local time: 05:46
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Andrea Kopf
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3 days 18 hrs
Cape maria. OR: Potiaris maribus/marium.


Explanation:
CAPE MARIA. Take/seize the seas.
POTIARIS MARIBUS, or else, POTIARIS MARIUM. (May you) be master of the seas.

You would not want to use CARPE, which means "pluck, harvest", and d_o_e_s n_o_t mean "seize". This verb is in fact mistranslated (!) in the English version of the famous phrase, CARPE DIEM, which most people think means, "seize the day". It actually means something like, "enjoy the fruits of this day."




    Ph. D. in ancient Greek, college instructor of Latin, Greek, and other languages.
Wigtil
PRO pts in pair: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Carole Reade-Kentros
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