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fitness

Latin translation: Caro Flavio (I'll remember from now on)

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09:12 Aug 14, 2001
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: fitness
you need to do some fitness
richard
Latin translation:Caro Flavio (I'll remember from now on)
Explanation:
I mistook your name, hopefully I did not mistake the appellative I called you by. People mistake my surname for my name all the time, but that's just a fact of life, I think worse things may happen to all of us. I do not know your dictionary, but I do know mine: Dizionario Latino - Italiano Calonghi, which I used a long time ago when I went to high school. This is what it says:
Ludo (verb):
- giocare, scherzare, divertirsi
- divertirsi a, con; scherzare, spassarsela
- rappresentare in modo scherzevole
- prendersi gioco di
- ludere palaestra = esercitarsi in palestra

ludus (noun)
- gioco, passatempo, ricreazione
- giochi pubblici
- scherzo, celia, burla
- scuola, come luogo di esercitazioni (of course including, but not limited to, physical exertions)

so ludere palaestra (something like "to play the gym") certainly means to take exercise, but let's not forget what the "gym" was in the Greek-Roman culture: a meeting point between men, a sort of social club. I don't think that you're serious that your translation "ludos agere" means "to do fitness" like an ordinary person would do to keep fit and maybe shed a few kilos; that's definitely something else, and in any case it does not mean to do fitness in that sense, although as I said it certainly means - among other things - to play sports in a social or competitive context. This I understood to be the meaning of Richard's question: as to what Richard needs, a literal or poetic or transcendental translation, I don't know, but nor do you, I believe, unless you have mental powers of which I'm deprived. I just tried, to the best of my abilities and of my belief, to keep to his question as he put it, nothing more and nothing less. You may want to interpret it differently and that's your privilege. People in this translation forum disagree with my answers all the time, so I think there's nothing to it that I should take seriously, except the opportunity to learn something new. Ciao!
Selected response from:

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 19:15
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2Caro Flavio (I'll remember from now on)
Francesco D'Alessandro
na +1Per niente offeso, caro Fabio... ehm, volevo dire FLAVIO!
Francesco D'Alessandro
naAddenda
flaviofbg
naExercere tibi est.
mayakal
natibi opus corpus exercere est
Francesco D'Alessandro
naCaro Francesco
flaviofbg
nanecesse est te ludos agere!
flaviofbg


  

Answers


5 mins
necesse est te ludos agere!


Explanation:
You need to do some fitness!

Ludos (Ludi) : accusative for fitness, gymnastics exercises to be fit.

Necesse est : you need to

agere : do

te: you (accusative since it's the subject of an infinitive clause)

Hope it helps :)

Flavio


    Translation Student
    Disctintion in Latin
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 20:15
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
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29 mins
tibi opus corpus exercere est


Explanation:
Latin phrase construction, especially in literary works, was somewhat strange, and correlated nouns and adjectives were often set apart in the word sequence.

Tibi = to you
opus est = it is necessary
corpus exercere = to take exercise, or to do fitness

"corpus exercere" was used by many great Roman authors, such as Cicero; opus est for "it is necessary" was a very common phrase.

I disagree with my friend Fabio in that "ludus" means "game, play" (even children's play), and its meaning was expanded to that of "competition", including - but not limited to - sports competitions; but it has nothing to do with taking exercise for one's health's sake. One famous example of such games were, for example, the "ludi gladiatorii", that is the fights among trained slaves that were so entertaining for the populace, and in which one of the two competitors was almost inevitably doomed to die.


Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 19:15
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 15
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

40 mins
Caro Francesco


Explanation:
Prima di tutto volevo dirti che mi chiamo Flavio e non Fabio (è già la terza volta :) ---

I found "Ludi -orum" in my Spanish Latin Dictionary, which gives that translation for "ejercicio físico" (fitness, indeed).

I certainly do not dare to say my dictionary, which is the Spanish standard used in all Classics High School, is wrong...will you? :)

Best wishes, Flavio

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 20:15
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
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41 mins
Exercere tibi est.


Explanation:
Latin was more concise than English, so I suggest this for its brevity.

mayakal
Local time: 20:15
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian
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42 mins
Addenda


Explanation:
Dear Francesco,

a further question: do Richard really need such a literaly-sounding version?

Best wishes, Flavio

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 20:15
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
Caro Flavio (I'll remember from now on)


Explanation:
I mistook your name, hopefully I did not mistake the appellative I called you by. People mistake my surname for my name all the time, but that's just a fact of life, I think worse things may happen to all of us. I do not know your dictionary, but I do know mine: Dizionario Latino - Italiano Calonghi, which I used a long time ago when I went to high school. This is what it says:
Ludo (verb):
- giocare, scherzare, divertirsi
- divertirsi a, con; scherzare, spassarsela
- rappresentare in modo scherzevole
- prendersi gioco di
- ludere palaestra = esercitarsi in palestra

ludus (noun)
- gioco, passatempo, ricreazione
- giochi pubblici
- scherzo, celia, burla
- scuola, come luogo di esercitazioni (of course including, but not limited to, physical exertions)

so ludere palaestra (something like "to play the gym") certainly means to take exercise, but let's not forget what the "gym" was in the Greek-Roman culture: a meeting point between men, a sort of social club. I don't think that you're serious that your translation "ludos agere" means "to do fitness" like an ordinary person would do to keep fit and maybe shed a few kilos; that's definitely something else, and in any case it does not mean to do fitness in that sense, although as I said it certainly means - among other things - to play sports in a social or competitive context. This I understood to be the meaning of Richard's question: as to what Richard needs, a literal or poetic or transcendental translation, I don't know, but nor do you, I believe, unless you have mental powers of which I'm deprived. I just tried, to the best of my abilities and of my belief, to keep to his question as he put it, nothing more and nothing less. You may want to interpret it differently and that's your privilege. People in this translation forum disagree with my answers all the time, so I think there's nothing to it that I should take seriously, except the opportunity to learn something new. Ciao!

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 19:15
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 15
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  flaviofbg: Ma ti sei offeso?Non ho mai detto che non mi piaceva la tua versione...cmq io sto imparando tantissimo dal Kudoz!Fla :)
56 mins
  -> leggi più sotto...

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1437 days
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4 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Per niente offeso, caro Fabio... ehm, volevo dire FLAVIO!


Explanation:
Ha, ha, ha!
Gimme five! If you allow me a half-joke, when I said that other fellow translators' disagreeing with me enables me to learn something new all the time, I was inaccurate: I should have said "most of the times". Sometimes, in fact, it's just an opportunity to... keep my own mind. So we're all entitled to our own opinions. Ma sei sempre un caro amico e un bravissimo traduttore. Buonanotte.
Alessandro (come mi chiama continuamente un sacco di gente invece di Francesco, ormai so che per loro Alessandro sono io e non qualcuno che mi sta seduto accanto).

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 19:15
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 15

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  flaviofbg: :)Beh, però almeno cosí puoi cambiare nome quando non ti piace uno dei due:)grazie per i comp.ma ho molto da imparare:)
14 hrs
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