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i love english

Latin translation: Angliorum linguam diligo

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:i love english
Latin translation:Angliorum linguam diligo
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14:06 Aug 14, 2001
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: i love english
Where i study i guess it's self explanatory !

thanks Stig from Denmark
Stig S
Angliorum linguam diligo
Explanation:
I just wanted to continue this interesting discussion with Francesco (what lengths translators have to go to sometimes!) about Britannia and Anglia. We can't call the language Britannica because they did not speak one language. You are right that English was born later but it is certainly closer to the Angli than to the Britanni. On "linguam" you are right as I said above.
This kind of translation poses historical and paradoxical problems. I prefer Angliorum also because it may refer to the language of other Anglos.


Ciao

Paola
Selected response from:

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 21:32
Grading comment
wery well documentet translation - thank you ! But isn't funny how different oppinions there are about this simple frase ! Thanks & Ciao from Stig S from Denmark ! Hope you will help me later ! With what a coat of arms !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1Angliorum linguam diligo
CLS Lexi-tech
na +1And I prefer lingua Britannica on geographical grounds
Francesco D'Alessandro
na +1I thought I might be content with my short comment to Paola's answer...
Francesco D'Alessandro
na +1Angliorum verbum diligo
CLS Lexi-tech
naLinguam caram habeo Britannicam
Francesco D'Alessandro
naBritannicam (Angliae) Linguam Amo
flaviofbg


  

Answers


21 mins
Britannicam (Angliae) Linguam Amo


Explanation:
Hope this helps, Stig!

Best wishes, Flavio


    Translation Student
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 03:32
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
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28 mins
Linguam caram habeo Britannicam


Explanation:
The construction of Latin phrases is quite peculiar, so that the word order is not what we would expect. Here for example the construction is: The language - I am fond of - English. Latin had no articles; I preferred to translate "I love" by "caram habeo" (I am fond of) instead of "amo" (I love) because I thought it to be more suitable for this kind of love... for a language.

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 02:32
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 15
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46 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Angliorum verbum diligo


Explanation:
I think that the Latins would have used "verbum" rather than "lingua" for language.
verbum, i (gen. plur. verbûm, Plaut. As. 1.3.1; id. Bacch. 4.8.37; id. Truc. 2.8.14), n. [from the root er; Gr. ERô, whence eirô and rhêma, what is spoken or said; cf. Goth. vaurd; Germ. Wort; Engl. word], a word; plur., words, expressions, language, discourse, conversation, etc. (cf.: vox, vocabulum).


Also we have a historical problem which is reflected in the definition of Angli (Angliorum)
Angli , ōrum, m., the Angli, a branch of the Suevi in Lower Germany, Tac. G. 40; c. A.D. 450 they united with the Saxons (hence the designation Anglo-Saxons), conquered Britannia, and gave their name to the country,--Anglia, England.
I think that if reference is made to English as the language that developed from the above conquest, then we have to use "Angliorum" of the English.

Diligo is the verb to use in this sense:
dî-ligo, lexi, lectum, 3, v. a. [2. lego]. Prop., to distinguish one by selecting him from others; hence, in gen., to value or esteem highly, to love (v. amo init., and cf. faveo, studeo, foveo, cupio; very freq. and class.).

regards
Paola L M


CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 21:32
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Francesco D'Alessandro: on all but on verbum as a people's language, all my sources say lingua prevails, try linguam latinam (acc) on Googles...
52 mins
  -> I think you are right, then: Angliorum linguam diligo. Grazie!
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2 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
I thought I might be content with my short comment to Paola's answer...


Explanation:
and let it be at that, but on second thought I feel I might contribute something else. Odd how so much may stem from such an apparently easy question! The world will not change for what we all say here, volumes have been written on that, but I might as well give my two eurocents' worth. I don't think that the Latins would say "verbum" for the language spoken by a people; all my sources, including my Badellino Italian - Latin dic, say lingua or sermo for this meaning. Besides, just try linguam latinam (in the accusative case, just to be sure there are no unwanted linguistic mixes) on Googles, then try verbum latinum and see what you'll get. Secondly, even though lingua Anglica or lingua Angliorum seems perfectly acceptable to me, just as lingua Britannica is, I don't agree that the reason lies in the Angli's conquest of what is known as today's England; the Angli were a Germanic population, and spoke a Germanic language. They sure gave their name to England for historical reasons, but the language they spoke had nothing to do with English, which as a language was born much later and is a charming mongrel of several languages just like Italian is; certainly it cannot be said that English was the language of the Angli, nor that the Angli ever were the English who as such stemmed from the later genetic and cultural interbreeding of several peoples and cultures, of which interbreeding the Angli were only a fraction. So much for the historical truth, even though lingua Anglia or Angliorum is perfectly acceptable and accepted for convenience reasons.

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 02:32
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 15

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  CLS Lexi-tech: see below. Ciao
39 mins
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2 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Angliorum linguam diligo


Explanation:
I just wanted to continue this interesting discussion with Francesco (what lengths translators have to go to sometimes!) about Britannia and Anglia. We can't call the language Britannica because they did not speak one language. You are right that English was born later but it is certainly closer to the Angli than to the Britanni. On "linguam" you are right as I said above.
This kind of translation poses historical and paradoxical problems. I prefer Angliorum also because it may refer to the language of other Anglos.


Ciao

Paola

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 21:32
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
wery well documentet translation - thank you ! But isn't funny how different oppinions there are about this simple frase ! Thanks & Ciao from Stig S from Denmark ! Hope you will help me later ! With what a coat of arms !

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Francesco D'Alessandro: Buon Ferragosto!
7 hrs
  -> Anche a te! Come va il lavoro? Ciao
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10 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
And I prefer lingua Britannica on geographical grounds


Explanation:
and for the very reason that it has no close connection with the Angli, who spoke what one might perhaps very inaccurately call "German". It is true, however, that their Germanic language is sometimes referred to as "old English", as opposed to "modern English" as we know it, but even though much more learned people than me use this expression, it seems far-fetched to me: it's like we called Latin "old Italian". Buon Ferragosto a te e "omnibus Protianibus".

Franciscus (which was no name at all in the Romans' Latin, still one can't say that it isn't Latin)

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 02:32
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 15

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  flaviofbg: Grazie, infatti ho preferito Britannica Lingua, mi sembrava più neutrale...ma esagerai con "amo" :)Buon Ferrag.Flavius
3 hrs
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