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21:41 Aug 15, 2010
English to Latin translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Real Estate / property management
English term or phrase: No guarantees
I need this translated for a business proposal.
mjgh
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Summary of answers provided
5Sine vadimonio
InfoMarex
4nullae satisdationes
Joseph Brazauskas
3 +1гарантия не предоставляется
Olga D.


  

Answers


53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
no guarantees
гарантия не предоставляется


Explanation:
..

Olga D.
Russian Federation
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  InfoMarex: Sine vadimonio
29 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
no guarantees
Sine vadimonio


Explanation:
.

InfoMarex
Ireland
Local time: 18:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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12 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
no guarantees
nullae satisdationes


Explanation:
This technical term refers to guarantees made in legally binding contracts, chiefly guarantees regarding the repayment of a debt to a creditor (cf. Digest, 46.3.49) and the provision of bail or security (cf. Cicero, ad Atticum, 5.1.2, Gaius, Institutes, 1.200, Digest, 2.8.1, 4.6.28, 46.5.1, 50.16.61).

'Vadimonium' too is a legal technical term, meaning a pledge to appear before a court on a set day that has been secured by bail, i.e., 'recognisance', as we would say in America. Gaius (op. cit. 4.184) defines its purpose thus:

Cum autem in ius vocatus fuerit adversarius, ni eo die finitum fuerit negotium, vadimonium ei faciendum est, id est, ut promittat, se certo die sisti.

The Latin for the common and lay sense of 'guarantee', i.e., as an informal promise or assurance of any kind, is 'promissum' and the Latin for 'no guarantees' in this sense would be 'nulla promissa'. But here the context is clearly legal.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
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