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If you are going to be a bear, be a grizzly!

Latin translation: si ursus fies, grislius canus esto.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:If you are going to be a bear, be a grizzly!
Latin translation:si ursus fies, grislius canus esto.
Entered by: David Wigtil
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00:14 Jun 7, 2002
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering
English term or phrase: If you are going to be a bear, be a grizzly!
It's just a saying.
Bob Rynes
si ursus fies, grislius canus esto.
Explanation:
This is the form you should use for a man. For a woman, use the sentence, "si ursa fies, grislia cana esto," which uses grammatically feminine forms.

Latin grammar normally uses the future tense (or the future-perfect tense) with "si (if)" as uses here, so the Latin verb is "fies", from "fio, fieri" ("to become" or "to be"). The word "esto" is an irregular form (of course) from "sum, esse" ("to be").

The grizzly is a North American bear, so the ancient Romans never had a name for it.

I am making up the word "grislius/grislia" and adding the word "canus", meaning "gray", since languages like French and German often denote this animal as the "gray bear".

--Loquamur

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Note added at 2002-06-10 12:34:27 (GMT)
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The Latin scientific name for the grizzly is \"ursus arctos horribilis\", meaning Bear-Bear-Bristling. (The word ARCTOS is ancient Greek (!) for \"bear\".) So, to be scientifically insulting in Latin, you might say, \"si ursus fies, arctos horribilis esto.\" --Loquamur
Selected response from:

David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 09:34
Grading comment
Hello,
Thank you all for the translation. You were a big help. I'll be sure to use you again.
God Bless,
Bob R.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4si ursus fies, grislius canus esto.
David Wigtil


  

Answers


12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
si ursus fies, grislius canus esto.


Explanation:
This is the form you should use for a man. For a woman, use the sentence, "si ursa fies, grislia cana esto," which uses grammatically feminine forms.

Latin grammar normally uses the future tense (or the future-perfect tense) with "si (if)" as uses here, so the Latin verb is "fies", from "fio, fieri" ("to become" or "to be"). The word "esto" is an irregular form (of course) from "sum, esse" ("to be").

The grizzly is a North American bear, so the ancient Romans never had a name for it.

I am making up the word "grislius/grislia" and adding the word "canus", meaning "gray", since languages like French and German often denote this animal as the "gray bear".

--Loquamur

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-10 12:34:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The Latin scientific name for the grizzly is \"ursus arctos horribilis\", meaning Bear-Bear-Bristling. (The word ARCTOS is ancient Greek (!) for \"bear\".) So, to be scientifically insulting in Latin, you might say, \"si ursus fies, arctos horribilis esto.\" --Loquamur


David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 09:34
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 60
Grading comment
Hello,
Thank you all for the translation. You were a big help. I'll be sure to use you again.
God Bless,
Bob R.
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