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My Dentist (male and female)

Portuguese translation: Meu/Minha Dentista

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09:21 Apr 20, 2000
English to Portuguese translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: My Dentist (male and female)
Do you say "my dentist" the same way regardless of gender? What about in Portugal vs Brazil? Thank you!
TRANSLEX International, Inc.
Portuguese translation:Meu/Minha Dentista
Explanation:
Dentista is a word that serves both genders. What will indicate whether it is a man or a woman is the article, pronoun or adjective preceding oit; in this case the possessive pronoun "meu" (masculine) or "minha" (feminine). This is for both Portugal and Brazil.
Selected response from:

Fabiano Cid
Grading comment
Muito obrigado a voce!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nameu/minha dentistaxxxLumen
naMeu dentista (male), minha dentista (female)JANE MENEZES
naDentista
Rodolfo Beneyto
nameu/minha dentistaPmiranda
naMeu/Minha DentistaFabiano Cid


  

Answers


4 mins
Meu/Minha Dentista


Explanation:
Dentista is a word that serves both genders. What will indicate whether it is a man or a woman is the article, pronoun or adjective preceding oit; in this case the possessive pronoun "meu" (masculine) or "minha" (feminine). This is for both Portugal and Brazil.

Fabiano Cid
PRO pts in pair: 12
Grading comment
Muito obrigado a voce!
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14 mins
meu/minha dentista


Explanation:
I agree with the given explanation!

Pmiranda
Portugal
Local time: 14:43
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57 mins
Dentista


Explanation:
I am Portuguese but lived in Brasil for a few years. "Dentista" is used regardless of gender. However, in Portugal you'd say "O meu dentista" or "A minha dentista", while in Brasil you'd say "Meu dentista" or "Minha dentista".

Rodolfo Beneyto
Portugal
Local time: 14:43
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 5
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1 hr
Meu dentista (male), minha dentista (female)


Explanation:
In most Portuguese phrases the only thing that doesn't vary in accordance with the gender is the verb. The rest (substantives, pronouns, adjectives, articles)have to be inflected. However, some substantives have what we call 2 genders. This is the case of dentist. So to define if it's a he or a she you have to see the rest of the phrase. That's why you have to put the article, the pronoun and/or the adjective in the correct gender. In Brazil, in some cases, you can omit the article. For example, when you say "My dentist is old" you don't need the article, although you need the correct pronoun. But if you say "I have a session with my dentist this afternoon" or "I'll give you my dentist address", then you have to use the correct article.

JANE MENEZES
PRO pts in pair: 12
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2 days 4 hrs
meu/minha dentista


Explanation:
Some nouns that indicate professions or occupations have only form for both genders, eg. artista, pianista, atendente, assistente, violinista to name just a few. The gender will be expressed by the possessives meu/minha or the definite article a/o.

xxxLumen
Brazil
Local time: 12:43
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 693
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