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Mommy

Russian translation: Мамочка

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Mommy
Russian translation:Мамочка
Entered by: Milana_R
Options:
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00:54 Jan 13, 2002
English to Russian translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Mommy
Mommy as maybey used by a little child to call her mother in an affectionat way.
angel
Мамочка
Explanation:
Pronounced: mamachka

HTH

But this is a question for En-Ru pair, not Russian monolingual... :)

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Note added at 2002-01-13 12:17:44 (GMT)
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Some older versions: \"Mamanya\", \"Maman\'ka\", \"Mamasha\"...
and if we really want to go down the list of all possible variations, add these:
Mamusya, Mamus\'ka, Mamka, Mamusechka, Mamusen\'ka, Mamul\'ka, etc...
However these lists seem to be way to elaborate for just a simple question with little or no context.
Selected response from:

Milana_R
Local time: 16:53
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Мамочка
Milana_R
4 +2Mamochka, mamoulya, mamoulenjka, mamoulechka, mamenjka
Mary Maksimova
5Мамочка, мамкаSteffen Pollex


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Мамочка


Explanation:
Pronounced: mamachka

HTH

But this is a question for En-Ru pair, not Russian monolingual... :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-13 12:17:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Some older versions: \"Mamanya\", \"Maman\'ka\", \"Mamasha\"...
and if we really want to go down the list of all possible variations, add these:
Mamusya, Mamus\'ka, Mamka, Mamusechka, Mamusen\'ka, Mamul\'ka, etc...
However these lists seem to be way to elaborate for just a simple question with little or no context.

Milana_R
Local time: 16:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 48
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rostislau Golod
9 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Mary Maksimova: I absolutely agree with your addition.
11 hrs
  -> thank you, I am sure there are some other variations we can come up with... :)

agree  Natalia Bearden
23 hrs
  -> thank you
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Mamochka, mamoulya, mamoulenjka, mamoulechka, mamenjka


Explanation:
These words, except the latest one, is commonly used.
The word 'mamenjka' is used more rarely than others but is not out-dated yet (I know, that it is used for nowadays in Siberia, for example).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-13 07:25:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In written Russian:
мама - мамочка, мамуля, мамуленька, мамулечка, маменька.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-17 10:47:15 (GMT)
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Well, to prove the fact of usage of these words by little children (e.g. I heard \"mamoulenjka\" from a girl of 2 (two!) years old) I should tell you a secret. (smile) I have two sons, 2.5 and 5 years old. They go to kindergarden five days a week, so I can see many little children and their mothers / grandmothers and listen their talks twice a day (\'mamoulechka\', \'bubousenjka\' and so on). As for my sons, they usually call me \'mama\' and sometimes the little one calls me \'mamochka\'. Moreover, I noticed, that little babies (2-3 yrs old) use more expressive words (and more sophisticated) than the oldest children (from 5-6 yrs old, I mean).

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Note added at 2002-01-17 10:48:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, to prove the fact of usage of these words by little children (e.g. I heard \"mamoulenjka\" from a girl of 2 (two!) years old) I should tell you a secret. (smile) I have two sons, 2.5 and 5 years old. They go to kindergarden five days a week, so I can see many little children and their mothers / grandmothers and listen their talks twice a day (\'mamoulechka\', \'bubousenjka\' and so on). As for my sons, they usually call me \'mama\' and sometimes the little one calls me \'mamochka\'. Moreover, I noticed, that little babies (2-3 yrs old) use more expressive words (and more sophisticated) than the oldest children (from 5-6 yrs old, I mean) do.

Mary Maksimova
Local time: 03:53
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 116

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rostislau Golod: Dear Mary, I am not sure about 3 last words: mamulenka comes with age, so is mamoulechka a child will not say it. MAMENKA is definitely what '
4 hrs
  -> Dear Rostislav, I have two children and take them to the kindergarten five days a week and that is I often hear from other children in the kindergarten.

agree  Natalia Bearden: "mamulenka comes with age..." I guess I was of age at 2 yrs old :o)
18 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Steffen Pollex
2 days 9 hrs
  -> Thank you!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Мамочка, мамка


Explanation:
These seem the most appropriate ones. The others,as to my experience, are too sophisticated and hardly used by really little children (what age do you mean, it makes a difference). At least, I never heard them from people/children younger than, let's say, ten years.


    own experience
Steffen Pollex
Local time: 01:53
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 272

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Mary Maksimova: As for me, the word "mamka" isn't good enough, there's some impolite sense in it (children feel that too when use this word). We have the same with names. As for sophistication, children just don't take it in mind while asking for new toys or candies. :)
1 day 16 hrs
  -> Agree, mamochka would do best, IMO.
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