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gray flower

Russian translation: "ceрая мышка" или "скромный цветочек"

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04:11 Nov 20, 2001
English to Russian translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / poetry
English term or phrase: gray flower
Sorry, there's no nice context to be found. I saw it in some verse. MultiLex and Lingvo wouldn't help either.
SamsonSV
Russian translation:"ceрая мышка" или "скромный цветочек"
Explanation:
It is probably about a not too colourful person you would not usually take notice of ?! It depends on the context: if you want to put it positively (i.e. you like this person for being this way, for doing something, fulfilling a duty etc. without making noise about it) you should use the 2nd term. If you are more bored than interested in this person, use the 1st one. "Grey flower" which would be "ceрый цветочек" is not used in Russian.
Selected response from:

Steffen Pollex
Local time: 16:31
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, that was very nice...
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1"ceрая мышка" или "скромный цветочек"Steffen Pollex
4седой цветок
Natalie
4см. ниже
Natasha Stoyanova


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"ceрая мышка" или "скромный цветочек"


Explanation:
It is probably about a not too colourful person you would not usually take notice of ?! It depends on the context: if you want to put it positively (i.e. you like this person for being this way, for doing something, fulfilling a duty etc. without making noise about it) you should use the 2nd term. If you are more bored than interested in this person, use the 1st one. "Grey flower" which would be "ceрый цветочек" is not used in Russian.


    25 years experience in Russian language, 10 of which spent in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan
Steffen Pollex
Local time: 16:31
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in RussianRussian
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, that was very nice...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bakytbek
2 mins
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
см. ниже


Explanation:
It\'s seems to me, that grey is used as a metaphor, often used in a poetry.
Some of the meanings of grey are:
skychnij, unilij, mrachnij - скучный, унылый, мрачный.


Natasha Stoyanova
Local time: 17:31
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Steffen Pollex: Why don't you provide a translation? "It seems to me" that you quite seldom get the point in what is demanded...:-)
1 hr
  -> Because, especially in poetry, it's difficult to translate only two words without any other context.
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
седой цветок


Explanation:
One possibility - a poem by James Schuyler.

"A Vermont Diary" in The Crystal Lithium is one of several seasonal sequences in Schuyler's work. It records a week in which the New York poet is both exquisitely conscious of nature and tracking the nature of his own consciousness:
A frail gray flower
flies off, an insect
that escaped the first
combing frosts. It's
not--"the fly buzzed"
finding moods, reflectives:
fall
equals melancholy, spring,
get laid: but to turn it all
one way: in repetition, change:
a continuity, the what
of which you are a part.
This sequence combines the observation of a camouflaged and soon-to-die insect, an allusion to Emily Dickinson's poem in which a fly signifies her fetish for mortality, and the romantic association of natural setting and human emotions; it illustrates the sundry and often remarkable ways in which the unoccupied
and unrehearsed mind encounters the world and accounts for itself.
http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~jconte/Schuyler_DLB.html

Another possibility - a poem by Amber D.Kelley 'Gray Cloud':
Stale smoke
Like chips left out to dry
Sticks to my clothes
And stings a little
Everywhere in me
Light it up
Like a gray flower
Blooming for a rainy day
In the cold
Lit up city
Light it up
http://www.envy.nu/nickosgirl/amberspoems2.html

Natalie
Poland
Local time: 16:31
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 187

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yuri Geifman: I've never come across this expression before... interesting poem :-)
46 mins

disagree  Steffen Pollex: Isn't it that through translation you should bring over the essence of a term, i.e. make clear what you mean rather than just mechanically put some words together? Your expression has nothing at all to do with common everyday Russian language. Sorry...
1 hr
  -> Dear Steffen, poetry has nothing to do with common everyday language on the whole. Sorry...
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