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tree hugger, lung hugger

Spanish translation: amador de nuestra tierra

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12:43 Oct 21, 2000
English to Spanish translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: tree hugger, lung hugger
I know the meaning of both, but I would like to know how widespread their use is, what are the connotations and what is the user profile, if any. Would someone say "I am a lung hugger" or is this a label that only heavy smokers would use in a derogatory way? And finally, is there something similar in any Spanish speaking country?
Thanks.
preguntona
Spanish translation:amador de nuestra tierra
Explanation:
I agree with Garabato. First of all, I have to admit I've never heard the term lung hugger even though I listen to right wing talk radio a lot for laughs. Tree hugger actually originated here in Minnesota where hundreds of people chained themselves to trees to try to stop "the Machine" (my word for political government) from devastating the MOST sacred of Indian woodlands here right in the middle of the city to widen a highway that even they say will be done away with in 20 years - meanwhile destroying hundreds of sacred trees 100's years old and springs that entire nations come for spiritual cleansing and never mind all that - 100's of people that lived in the houses they grew up in and their parents grew up in that loved the wilderness they lived in while in the city. Not only the native Americans but the youth that feels the truth (tree huggers) came out in full force from around the State- and yes, they literally hugged the trees - they chained themselves to the trees -and mind you, this is in Minnesota summer- fall-winter -BRUTAL and yet they were taken by force and the deed was done. They shut off heat and electricity on the homes (ALL inhabited by now by 90 year old women or old incapacitated couples that loved their lives so much they refused to leave even if it meant death) . Makes you proud, huh? Anyway, I've gotta mention that this was before our present Governor (Jesse Ventura) and it would never have happened with him (I don't know if you're aware of this or care but we're the first state that elected a POPULIST -read, real person, to be Gov. His logo is "we shocked the world" and that;s what happened.. Never would've happened- that police state stuff. ANYWAY, I'm sure this is MUCH more than you wanted to know. But "tree hugger" came to encompass eveyone that cared about our earth or the innocent critters that live upon it. Sneering by by the radical right and proud by those who feel and care. Sorry I got off on such a tangent when I realy have nothing to offer you but I just had to let it out - it nothing else so that you knew the true meaning of tree hugger. And no, I don't think there is a translation (yet) unless it's amador de la tierra. Sorry if I wasted your time. Good luck to you!
Selected response from:

Megdalina
Grading comment
Gracias a todos por sus contribuciones, aprendí mucho. Lo de abrazafarolas fue un verdadero caso de serendipity, pues aunque no es lo que buscaba, me parece una palabra muy simpática.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naamador de nuestra tierraMegdalina
nainteresado en el medio ambiente
Gloria Nichols
naabrazafarolas and othersxxxTransOl


  

Answers


15 mins
abrazafarolas and others


Explanation:
An abrazafarolas is a derogatory term describing person who is deseperatedly in need of somthing or someone. Ther terms originates when a drunk person hugs a lamppost to avoid falling. There is a similar expression which is "agarrarse a un clavo ardiendo" to hold on a burning nail

xxxTransOl
PRO pts in pair: 504

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
xxxJon Zuber
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2 hrs
interesado en el medio ambiente


Explanation:
Let's see...I'm in the U.S., and I suspect those terms come from here and are used here more than elsewhere at this point (if they're used elsewhere at all). "Tree hugger" is known and understood by most people in the U.S., and its use is reasonably widespread among better-educated folks. The connotation can be either good or pejorative, depending on the context. If I say it about myself or someone I admire it's great -- we are personally responsible for saving the rainforests! -- but if it's a lumber company talking about environmentalists impeding their cutting practices, you can picture the snarl on their faces.

I never heard of "lung hugger," so I'd say it hasn't caught on yet.

Don't know any catchy Spanish term for either one, sorry. Maybe another colleague can come up with that.


    xx
Gloria Nichols
United States
Local time: 18:11
PRO pts in pair: 41
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13 hrs
amador de nuestra tierra


Explanation:
I agree with Garabato. First of all, I have to admit I've never heard the term lung hugger even though I listen to right wing talk radio a lot for laughs. Tree hugger actually originated here in Minnesota where hundreds of people chained themselves to trees to try to stop "the Machine" (my word for political government) from devastating the MOST sacred of Indian woodlands here right in the middle of the city to widen a highway that even they say will be done away with in 20 years - meanwhile destroying hundreds of sacred trees 100's years old and springs that entire nations come for spiritual cleansing and never mind all that - 100's of people that lived in the houses they grew up in and their parents grew up in that loved the wilderness they lived in while in the city. Not only the native Americans but the youth that feels the truth (tree huggers) came out in full force from around the State- and yes, they literally hugged the trees - they chained themselves to the trees -and mind you, this is in Minnesota summer- fall-winter -BRUTAL and yet they were taken by force and the deed was done. They shut off heat and electricity on the homes (ALL inhabited by now by 90 year old women or old incapacitated couples that loved their lives so much they refused to leave even if it meant death) . Makes you proud, huh? Anyway, I've gotta mention that this was before our present Governor (Jesse Ventura) and it would never have happened with him (I don't know if you're aware of this or care but we're the first state that elected a POPULIST -read, real person, to be Gov. His logo is "we shocked the world" and that;s what happened.. Never would've happened- that police state stuff. ANYWAY, I'm sure this is MUCH more than you wanted to know. But "tree hugger" came to encompass eveyone that cared about our earth or the innocent critters that live upon it. Sneering by by the radical right and proud by those who feel and care. Sorry I got off on such a tangent when I realy have nothing to offer you but I just had to let it out - it nothing else so that you knew the true meaning of tree hugger. And no, I don't think there is a translation (yet) unless it's amador de la tierra. Sorry if I wasted your time. Good luck to you!

Megdalina
PRO pts in pair: 55
Grading comment
Gracias a todos por sus contribuciones, aprendí mucho. Lo de abrazafarolas fue un verdadero caso de serendipity, pues aunque no es lo que buscaba, me parece una palabra muy simpática.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
ZoeZoe
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