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fop

Spanish translation: petimetre

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:fop
Spanish translation:petimetre
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13:37 Jun 20, 2001
English to Spanish translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: fop
...but look at his dandy, showiness.... the man's a fop!
Bill
lechuguino, petimetre, mequetrefe
Explanation:
Hay muchos pero creo que simplemente son variaciones de lo mismo.

Saludos:-)

tb
Selected response from:

Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 08:39
Grading comment
I find all three very acceptable (perhaps 'petimetre' has the most equivalent ring to it. Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
napresumido, mequetrefeCarol Shaw
naComentario
Mauricio López Langenbach
navanidoso
Mauricio López Langenbach
nalechuguino, petimetre, mequetrefe
Terry Burgess
napetulante, ostentoso, presumidoxxxOso
napetimetre, pisaverde, currutaco
Parrot


  

Answers


3 mins
petimetre, pisaverde, currutaco


Explanation:
vamos, un fantasma.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 15:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 330

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
gcaddy: pisaverde vale
48 mins
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5 mins
petulante, ostentoso, presumido


Explanation:
Good luck and greetings from Oso ¶:^)

xxxOso
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 9863

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Terry Burgess: These 3 are more properly used as adjectives. "fop" is a noun.
12 mins
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8 mins
lechuguino, petimetre, mequetrefe


Explanation:
Hay muchos pero creo que simplemente son variaciones de lo mismo.

Saludos:-)

tb


    Oxford Superlex, Simon & Schuster's, + Exp.
Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 08:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3315
Grading comment
I find all three very acceptable (perhaps 'petimetre' has the most equivalent ring to it. Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 mins
vanidoso


Explanation:
En este caso, me parece que se refiere más a ese sentido de la palabra...
Según el Webster's:
"a vain, affected man who pays too much attention to his appearance, clothes, etc."

"¡El hombre es un vanidoso!"


    Webster's
Mauricio López Langenbach
New Zealand
Local time: 03:39
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 327

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Terry Burgess: "Fop" is a noun. "vanidoso" is more properly used as an adjective.
6 mins
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24 mins
presumido, mequetrefe


Explanation:
or any of the other words given above by the rest - it, as well as "dandy", come from around the Regency era in England, where society divided itself into different groups according to their style of dress and activity. On the one end were the fops and dandies who would consider themselves quite handsome in bright yellow matching leggings and waistcoat (the fops tended to be a bit more pretentious) and practiced crying with sensitivity; then there were the bluestockings (with their noses in books and lecture on the lips); and at the other end the corinthians, who pursued a sort of tailored elegance and worked at sports (in order to go home and have their valets undress them. *grin*)

That whole era is fascinating - a period in history where one level of society could so partition itself because it had absolutely nothing more on its mind than clothing and fashion! If you've ever seen "The Scarlett Pimpernel", you have a good example of a "fop".

Carol Shaw
Local time: 08:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 43

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Sarah Brenchley: bit too simplified
23 mins
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39 mins
Comentario


Explanation:
Quien haya hecho el comentario acerca de que "vanidoso" debe usarse más como adjetivo que como sustantivo, seguramente no ha leído la versión en español de "El Principito", de la cual adjunto un extracto:

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Delphi/1469/principito/cap11...

"Capitulo XI


El segundo planeta estaba habitado por un vanidoso:

-¡Ah! ¡Ah! ¡Un admirador viene a visitarme! -Gritó el vanidoso al divisar a lo lejos al principito.

Para los vanidosos todos los demás hombres son admiradores."

Y así continúa la historia...

"Vanidoso" es una de las tantas palabras que en castellano pueden usarse como adjetivo Y como sustantivo.


Mauricio López Langenbach
New Zealand
Local time: 03:39
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 327

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Patricia Lutteral: evidente sentido común
1 hr

xxxOso: ¡Muy bien Andino! ¶:^)
3 hrs
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