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girl

Spanish translation: niña, chica, joven, muchacha...

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:girl
Spanish translation:niña, chica, joven, muchacha...
Entered by: Andrea Bullrich
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

07:50 Oct 19, 2001
English to Spanish translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: girl
girl
Charlie Crawford
niña, chica, joven, muchacha...
Explanation:
Depending on context, target country, etc.
HTH
Selected response from:

Andrea Bullrich
Local time: 11:30
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +14niña, chica, joven, muchacha...
Andrea Bullrich
5 +6Depending on the age and context,
mónica alfonso
4 +3chica, muchachaJesús Paredes
5A personal explanatory note to Charlie...Lafuente
4 +1Chica, muchacha, joven, etc.Jesús Paredes


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +14
niña, chica, joven, muchacha...


Explanation:
Depending on context, target country, etc.
HTH

Andrea Bullrich
Local time: 11:30
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 1650
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Leliadoura: :-)
1 min
  -> Tks! : - )

agree  Sery
6 mins
  -> Gracias!

agree  Dito: Hola Nadrea :>
6 mins
  -> Hola... Itdo? (just teasing, of course!) Gracias! : - ))

agree  Diplomonde: This is correct
9 mins
  -> Thank you! : - )

agree  xxxOso: chavita o chava es otra opción! ¶:^)
18 mins
  -> Tks for the Mexican touch! : - )

agree  Lafuente: To me, this is the best answer.
55 mins
  -> Gracias! : - )

agree  Gabriela Tenenbaum: Hi Girl! #:))
1 hr
  -> Hola, gracias! : - )

agree  pzulaica
1 hr
  -> Gracias, Paula! : - )

agree  dmwray
1 hr
  -> Thanks! : )

agree  Maria Asis
3 hrs
  -> Gracias, María! : - )

agree  TransHispania
3 hrs
  -> Gracias! : - )

agree  xxxtazdog: :-)))
3 hrs
  -> : - )))))))))))

agree  sercominter
5 hrs
  -> Gracias, Juan : - )

agree  Jesús Paredes: Esta muchacha sí ha dado de qué hablar y eso que es una buena chica.
14 hrs
  -> : - )))))))))))))))
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Depending on the age and context,


Explanation:
it can be rendered as:
-chica
-muchacha
-nena
-niña
-mujer
-señorita
and maybe some others

mónica alfonso
Local time: 11:30
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 1657

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrea Bullrich: : )
0 min
  -> Thanks, chica

agree  Leliadoura: :-))
1 min
  -> Gracias, muchacha

agree  Myrtha
3 mins
  -> Gracias, Myrtha

agree  xxxOso: ¶:^) What about me? ¶:^)
6 mins
  -> You're a nice bear, and that's all!

agree  Diplomonde: mujer is a girl, a girl is not necessarily a mujer...!
9 mins
  -> That's true! It depends on many things, doesn't it?

disagree  Lafuente: Sorry Monica, but we have other English terms for "mujer", "señorita" and "nena" Definitely, they are not "girls"
58 mins
  -> I disagree with you, Lafuente, and I'm a native speaker who lived in the USA some time.

agree  Jesús Paredes: My 90-year old aunt keeps calling her contempary friends "muchachas".
2 hrs
  -> I call myfriends 'chicas' (though I won't tel you how old I am! :)

agree  Bertha S. Deffenbaugh: Vivo en USA y acá se usa GIRL para referirse a mujeres de CUALQUIER edad. Who told you>? That girl over there.
5 hrs
  -> Gracias, Bertha
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
chica, muchacha


Explanation:
Estoy de acuerdo con Andrea y Mónica. Por supuesto que el término "girl" puede referirse a una mujer, una señorita o una nena. He oído a mujeres mayores referirse a sus contemporáneas como "girls" y "muchachas". También he oído el término "girl" o "muchacha" cuando se habla de una niña muy pequeña. En ambos idiomas, los términos son bastante flexibles. Por supuesto que la traducción literal de "señorita", "mujer" o "nena" no es "girl". Creo que el contexto y la edad de la persona que lo utiliza son mucho más importantes.

Jesús Paredes
Local time: 10:30
PRO pts in pair: 302

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fernando Muela: Para mí, "Girl" es una canción de los Beatles, y no puede significar más que "chica"
2 hrs
  -> La palabra chica es polisémica. Cuando digo "caja chica", la palabra "chica" no tiene nada que ver con "girl".

agree  Bertha S. Deffenbaugh: Vivo en USA y si te refieres a una mujer de 60 años dice GIRL o lady. Cualquiera.
3 hrs

agree  Andrea Bullrich: : )
23 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Chica, muchacha, joven, etc.


Explanation:
Overview of noun girl
The noun girl has 5 senses (first 5 from tagged texts)
1. (80) girl, miss, missy, young lady, young woman, fille -- (a young woman; ``a young lady of 18'' )
2. (57) female child, girl, little girl -- (a youthful female person; ``the baby was a girl"; "the girls were just learning to ride a tricycle'' )
3. (8) daughter, girl -- (a female human offspring; ``her daughter cared for her in her old age'' )
4. (6) girlfriend, girl, lady friend -- (a girl or young woman with whom a man is romantically involved; ``his girlfriend kicked him out'' )
5. (5) girl -- (a friendly informal reference to a grown woman; ``Mrs. Smith was just one of the girls'' )



Main Entry: girl
Pronunciation: 'g&r(-&)l
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English gurle, girle young person of either sex
Date: 14th century
1 a : a female child b : a young unmarried woman c sometimes offensive : a single or married woman of any age
2 a : SWEETHEART b sometimes offensive : a female servant or employee c : DAUGHTER
- girl·hood /-"hud/ noun


    Reference: http://www.notredame.ac.jp/cgi-bin/wn
    Reference: http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary
Jesús Paredes
Local time: 10:30
PRO pts in pair: 302

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrea Bullrich: `When I make a word do a lot of work like that,' said Humpty Dumpty, `I always pay it extra.' ; )
20 hrs
  -> I wished clients paid me extra after doing a good job. Thank you for bringing up this phrase. I really like it!
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
A personal explanatory note to Charlie...


Explanation:
Hi Charlie:

I get the feeling that you are a young boy and I would hate to leave you with this doubt...

AIM was very right with her choice. I honestly believe you should award her with KudoZ points as she offered you with the best choices in Spanish for the “girl” term, since this stands for a female individual, from new born up to the age of 19 years old. After this stage, women are to be addressed to as “ladies”. You can also place adjectives here, depending on their age, such as “young” (from 20 to 35 years old), “middle aged” (from 35 to 55 years old) or “old” (from 55 onwards).

Just think about this: How many times have you heard about “an old girl”? Maybe only while referring to a girl who is bitter about Life, and therefore, in serious trouble... A real girl cannot be older than 19, not here in America and nor in China, as well!

Just for instance, we have this great actress and singer, Ms Barbra Streisand. Many years ago, she played the main role at the very famous “Funny Girl” film, featuring the character of a young woman. When she made the second part of it, about 10 years later, the movie was then called “Funny Lady”. Does that ring the bell to you?

I have no doubt that old women are actually referred to as “girls” in the U.S.A., but this is inappropriate, grammatically speaking. I am sure you have heard your teachers saying: "This is said but it is incorrect" To give you a further reference, the Appleton's New Cuyas Dictionary, which is a renown dictionary, textually reads under the "girl" term: muchacha, niña; girl scout: niña exporadora. Also: Sirvienta, criada, which means “maid or servant”. It does not include terms such as "mujer" (woman, housewife), "nena" (dear, darling, infant) nor "señorita" (miss)

Well, Charlie, I really hope this will be of help to you.

With my best wishes,

Lafuente.



Lafuente
PRO pts in pair: 104
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