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shale

Spanish translation: lutita

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:shale
Spanish translation:lutita
Entered by: Aldona Parra
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

23:09 Apr 25, 2008
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Science - Environment & Ecology / Physiological Plant Ecology
English term or phrase: shale
Tengo un gran problema en esta traducción, pues aparecen (y en el mismo párrafo) shale y slate, cuya traducción al español es la misma: pizarra. La única alternativa que he encontrado para shale (slate es claramente pizarra) es "limolita".

Si alguien sabe realmente si me sirve o tengo que dejar ambas como pizarra (con Nota de la T) por favor, ayúdeme!!

ahh, el trozo es:

"Slate, phyllite, quartzite and marble are examples of rocks, most of which weather relatively easily. Sedimentary rocks are formed by compactation and cementation of sediments, which are either rock fragments, deposits, and erosion products (conglomerates,sandstone, marl, shales) or deposits of biogenic origin (limestone from reef rock or chalk, or from silicate slates)."

Gracias
Catalina Jadue
Local time: 08:24
lutita
Explanation:
Espero te sirva.
Selected response from:

Aldona Parra
Mexico
Local time: 08:24
Grading comment
Muchísimas gracias, definitivamente, lutita es la respuesta que necesitaba

Catalina Jadue
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6esquisto
neilmac
5 +2lutitaEnrique Espinosa
4 +2lutita
Aldona Parra


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lutita


Explanation:
Espero te sirva.



    Reference: http://www.irnase.csic.es/users/microleis/microlei/manual1/s...
Aldona Parra
Mexico
Local time: 08:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Muchísimas gracias, definitivamente, lutita es la respuesta que necesitaba

Catalina Jadue

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  neilmac: La lutita es una roca detrítica, es decir, formada por detritos, no en laminas como la pizarra.
1 min

agree  Enrique Espinosa: slate es pizarra; shale es lutita. La pizarra es una roca de textura esquistosa, la lutita no. La pizarra y la filita (Phyllite) son consideradas de grado metamórfico bajo, mientras que la lutita es sedimentaria, sin metamorfismo alguno
1 hr
  -> Gracias!

agree  Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT: Sí, es lutita para mí.
30 days
  -> Gracias Tomás
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
esquisto


Explanation:
OXFORD Superlex: shale -> esquisto m, pizarra f

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Note added at 11 mins (2008-04-25 23:20:30 GMT)
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No entiendo el comentario del colega.

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Note added at 13 mins (2008-04-25 23:22:23 GMT)
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Roca formada en láminas como la pizarra, suele tomar el nombre del mineral más abundante, Ej. Esquisto ferruginoso (hierro), calcoesquisto (calcáreo), etc.

neilmac
Spain
Local time: 15:24
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sergio Gaymer
13 mins
  -> Thank you Sergio :)

agree  margaret caulfield
21 mins
  -> Cheers MC ;)

neutral  Enrique Espinosa: El esquisto (schist), la pizarra (slate) y la filita (phyllite), son todas rocas hojosas, metamórficas que se diferencian por le grado de metamrofismo. La lutita (shale) es similar, pero no tiene metamorfismo, se le considera una roca sedimentaria.
1 hr
  -> No obstante, el Oxford lo pone como primera definicion.

agree  Carmen Schultz
6 hrs
  -> Gracias Carmen :)

agree  Egmont
11 hrs

agree  Sandra Rodriguez: Refs para estudio arriba
17 hrs

agree  RichardDeegan
17 hrs

neutral  Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT: Como Enrique, también pienso que es "lutita". El motivo es que la shale ("lutita") no es metamórfica, sólo sedimentaria, mientras que el esquisto ya es una roca cristalina, metamórfica.
30 days
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lutita


Explanation:
I am not pretending to answer the question, as I agreed before with Aldona Parra. She's right; I just want to include here a couple of definitions from geologic dictionaries (and my own experience as a geologist for more than 30 years), and be clear about the differences between schist and shale. Thanks.

Definition: schist
1. A strongly foliated crystalline rock, formed by dynamic metamorphism, that can be readily split into thin flakes or slabs due to the well developed parallelism of more than 50% of the minerals present, particularly those of lamellar or elongate prismatic habit, e.g., mica and hornblende. The mineral composition is not an essential factor in its definition unless specif. included in the rock name, e.g., quartz-muscovite schist. Varieties may also be based on general composition, e.g., calc-silicate schist, amphibole schist; or on texture, e.g., spotted schist.


Definition: shale
1. A fine-grained detrital sedimentary rock, formed by the consolidation (esp. by compression) of clay, silt, or mud. It is characterized by finely laminated structure, which imparts a fissility approx. parallel to the bedding, along which the rock breaks readily into thin layers, and by an appreciable content of clay minerals and detrital quartz; a thinly laminated or fissile claystone, siltstone, or mudstone. It is generally soft but sufficiently indurated so that it will not fall apart on wetting; it is less firm than argillite and slate, commonly has a splintery fracture and a smooth feel, and is easily scratched. Its color may be red, brown, black, or gray. Etymol: Teutonic, probably Old English scealu, shell, husk, akin to German schale, shell.
Source: AGI



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Note added at 17 hrs (2008-04-26 16:30:20 GMT)
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Sorry, you can check the next link:
http://xmlwords.infomine.com/xmlwords.htm?term=shale

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Note added at 17 hrs (2008-04-26 16:49:25 GMT)
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Y sí, shale puede ser limolita como dice Catalina. Lutita y limolita, son muy similares, la diferencia está en el tamaño del grano (que de todos modos es extremadamente fino)

Enrique Espinosa
Local time: 08:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT: En efecto. Así lo entiendo yo. Hay diferencia con un "schist" y con una "slate" por el grado de metamosfosis (en la lutita muy bajo, si lo hay).
29 days
  -> ¡Gracias, Tomás!

agree  neilmac: Chapò chicos... stone me if you're not right ;)
31 days
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Changes made by editors
Apr 29, 2008 - Changes made by Aldona Parra:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term
Apr 25, 2008 - Changes made by RichardDeegan:
Language pairSpanish to English » English to Spanish


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