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peel the onion back

Spanish translation: examinar minuciosamente/cuidadosamente

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:peel the onion back
Spanish translation:examinar minuciosamente/cuidadosamente
Entered by: Valeria Echenique
Options:
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18:55 Aug 26, 2014
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / General
English term or phrase: peel the onion back
Hola!
Alguien podrá ayudarme a encontrar un equivalente en español para esta expresión????


"The second quarter financial results were recently announced and, if you peel the onion back, a number of emerging trends are apparent".

Gracias!!
Valeria Echenique
Argentina
Local time: 14:05
examinar minuciosamente/cuidadosamente
Explanation:
Una versión más, considerando que hacerlo hacia atrás requiere de un sumo cuidado para no lamentar la decisión tomada. Considerar todos los detalles antes de decidir.

Advice and How-Tos
Peeling Back The Onion
by Randall Birkwood Jan 11, 2005
inShare
1


What does “peeling back the onion” mean to you? For you who have not heard the expression, it refers to learning more about something or someone by peeling back the layers. It’s unfortunate that we don’t do a very good job of peeling back the onion when it comes to hiring people. We make only the slightest effort to know what a candidate is made of. We typically bring them in for a round of interviews and ask them only the most basic of questions that refer to their experience and knowledge. We then make them an offer and ó voila! ó they’re hired. Can you imagine if you did that with a prospective spouse? I don’t mean spending only four hours interacting with him on dates; I mean spending only four hours asking him the most basic questions about dating experiences, whether he likes kids and pets, etc. Well, folks, that’s how deep we get when it comes to hiring. We make a decision that will affect our company’s future based on a few disorganized meetings with a candidate ó and we haven’t even peeled back the first two layers! So how do we go about peeling back the onion so we can truly learn about the candidates we interview? First of all, we have to determine what we want to learn about them. Will their past work experience be a predictor of their success at your company? Sometimes, but not always. Is their knowledge a good predictor of their success? Sometimes, but not always. Are their behaviors an important predictor of success? Always. So why do we relentlessly focus on someone’s experience and knowledge, but seldom learn about what makes her tick? I have rarely seen anyone get fired for poor knowledge, but I have often seen people let go because of a poor attitude, laziness, or unwillingness to work with others. When you put a recruitment strategy together, I suggest you consider these questions:

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2014-08-26 20:22:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

peel an onion This metaphor is often used to describe an enlightened approach to problem solving: By methodically removing each layer of the onion, one is able to appreciate the complexities at each level as you eventually reach the core where you can objectively define the problem

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2014-08-26 20:23:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

www.answers.com/Q/What_does_the_phrase_peel_the_onion_mean
Selected response from:

lugoben
Canada
Local time: 12:05
Grading comment
Muchísimas gracias!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Si miras bajo la alfombra...
SabriR
3 +3examinar minuciosamente/cuidadosamente
lugoben
4 +1revisar a fondo
Wilsonn Perez Reyes
4si te fijas / observas detenidamenteCarolinSpain
3si vuelves a analizar / si analizas otra vez / si volvemos a analizarJohnMcDove


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
revisar a fondo


Explanation:
si se revisa a fondo

Wilsonn Perez Reyes
El Salvador
Local time: 11:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Guillermina Fernandez: Estoy de acuerdo con Wilsonn, pero me parece que "observar/analizar detalladamente" es un poquito más formal para el contexto.
11 mins
  -> Muchas gracias, guillermif.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
si vuelves a analizar / si analizas otra vez / si volvemos a analizar


Explanation:

peel the onion (v. phrase)
To conduct a layer-by-layer analysis of a complex problem and in the process, reduce yourself to tears.

http://www.johnsmurf.com/jargon2.htm

En tu contexto, no parece que haga falta la connotación de las lágrimas al pelar la cebolla...

Suerte.


JohnMcDove
United States
Local time: 09:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 320
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
examinar minuciosamente/cuidadosamente


Explanation:
Una versión más, considerando que hacerlo hacia atrás requiere de un sumo cuidado para no lamentar la decisión tomada. Considerar todos los detalles antes de decidir.

Advice and How-Tos
Peeling Back The Onion
by Randall Birkwood Jan 11, 2005
inShare
1


What does “peeling back the onion” mean to you? For you who have not heard the expression, it refers to learning more about something or someone by peeling back the layers. It’s unfortunate that we don’t do a very good job of peeling back the onion when it comes to hiring people. We make only the slightest effort to know what a candidate is made of. We typically bring them in for a round of interviews and ask them only the most basic of questions that refer to their experience and knowledge. We then make them an offer and ó voila! ó they’re hired. Can you imagine if you did that with a prospective spouse? I don’t mean spending only four hours interacting with him on dates; I mean spending only four hours asking him the most basic questions about dating experiences, whether he likes kids and pets, etc. Well, folks, that’s how deep we get when it comes to hiring. We make a decision that will affect our company’s future based on a few disorganized meetings with a candidate ó and we haven’t even peeled back the first two layers! So how do we go about peeling back the onion so we can truly learn about the candidates we interview? First of all, we have to determine what we want to learn about them. Will their past work experience be a predictor of their success at your company? Sometimes, but not always. Is their knowledge a good predictor of their success? Sometimes, but not always. Are their behaviors an important predictor of success? Always. So why do we relentlessly focus on someone’s experience and knowledge, but seldom learn about what makes her tick? I have rarely seen anyone get fired for poor knowledge, but I have often seen people let go because of a poor attitude, laziness, or unwillingness to work with others. When you put a recruitment strategy together, I suggest you consider these questions:

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2014-08-26 20:22:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

peel an onion This metaphor is often used to describe an enlightened approach to problem solving: By methodically removing each layer of the onion, one is able to appreciate the complexities at each level as you eventually reach the core where you can objectively define the problem

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2014-08-26 20:23:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

www.answers.com/Q/What_does_the_phrase_peel_the_onion_mean


    Reference: http://www.ere.net/2005/01/11/peeling-back-the-onion/
lugoben
Canada
Local time: 12:05
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Muchísimas gracias!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Susana Jeronimo
30 mins
  -> Thank you Susana, I am grateful for your backing, Saludos

agree  Mónica Algazi
1 hr
  -> thank you Monica, I appreciate your support, Saludos

agree  Penelope Ausejo
50 days
  -> Gracias Penelope, Saludos
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Si miras bajo la alfombra...


Explanation:
Lo diría así.

Suerte!

SabriR
Argentina
Local time: 14:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Phoenix III: I like it because it's equivalent to the English version. It fits like a glove.
1 hr
  -> Gracias! :) Lo pensé por eso.

agree  Agustina Bellino: Tal cual si la intención es mantener la metáfora (yo sí trataría de mantenerla).
4 hrs
  -> Gracias! :)

agree  Martin Harvey
1 day 15 hrs
  -> Gracias, Martin! :)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
si te fijas / observas detenidamente


Explanation:
una propuesta :-)

CarolinSpain
Spain
Local time: 18:05
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in CatalanCatalan
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