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in good company

Spanish translation: bien acompañado (México, España, Argentina); estar en buena compañía (Colombia, Argentina, España); codearse con los meros meros

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:in good company
Spanish translation:bien acompañado (México, España, Argentina); estar en buena compañía (Colombia, Argentina, España); codearse con los meros meros
Entered by: Michael Powers (PhD)
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

21:59 Dec 15, 2005
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
English term or phrase: in good company
I have decided to compile a somewhat thorough English-Spanish glossary, a long-standing goal I have had for many years but never actually done. In approximately 10% of the cases, I am recurring to you, my colleagues on Proz, to ask you to help me get appropriate translations into Spanish of a number of idioms.

I want to assure everyone that ALL TRANSLATIONS WILL BE SHARED on the open forum we have in Proz. The way I guarantee this is by choosing “one answer” to which I incorporate many of the other answers, and then I click to save the question and answer on the open Proz forum.

Selection criteria: 1) extensive usage throughout the Spanish-speaking world. I am counting on your help, and since usually colleagues simply agree without adding where they know the translated term to be used, I am not able to specify this in the answers. This is not a commercial enterprise, but rather an informal exercise for the benefit of all of us. 2) Many times there are really creative idioms that are used which, although not used necessarily throughout the Spanish-speaking world, would be readily understood by all. I am particularly happy to include these in the open forum so that we can all enjoy them in our use, whether literally, or perhaps with an adaptation to the degree that each translator deems appropriate for that particular target population.
Please, when you agree with an answer, mention the countries in which you know such idiom to be used, if not already mentioned by another colleague. Since this project is so time-consuming and endless, and since, like you, I have such a heavy load of translations and interpreting jobs to do and cannot spend umpteen million hours on it, I must count on your help. And although simply listing countries because another translator says so is in no way scientific, at least it is an interesting start.

Finally, I know context is everything. Quite often I will give the meaning(s) in which I am interested, and I will attempt to include a sample. Some sources, such as the Random House Dictionary, already have an example, so there is no need for me to do this, since time is of essence.

Thank you for your help.



definition: be in the same situation as someone important or respected.


Please give answers that are more creative than "en buena compañnía"

Thanks



example:

Some people have suggested that these photos of President Bush are a metaphor for this administration's broader problem with "exit strategies." Say Wha? won't go there. Instead, we'll just note that the photos carry forward our nation's rich bipartisan tradition of enjoying the sight of our presidents looking ridiculous.

Who can forget Gerald Ford stumbling down the steps of Air Force One? Lyndon Johnson showing off his surgery scar? Richard Nixon doing his creepy victory sign? Jimmy Carter using a canoe paddle to fend off a killer rabbit? Or William Henry Harrison refusing to wear a heavy coat during his inauguration and dropping dead from pneumonia?

So President Bush is in good company. At least his Asia trip was a success in the sense that he didn't throw up on anyone in public, which is more than his father can say.

Anyway, speaking of exit strategies, it turns out that the president has one after all. The 35-page "National Strategy for Victory in Iraq" was posted on the White House's Web site the other day as part of a new media blitz that began with the president's speech to midshipmen at Annapolis.

Sure, it would have been nice to see a 35-page strategy for victory before the war started, but White House operatives saw no reason to bother with such a bulky document back when they were expecting the Iraqi people to throw rose petals at our troops' feet and offer to pay for the U.S. occupation with their new oil revenues.

It also would have been nice if the "National Strategy for Victory in Iraq" had come from Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, instead of Peter Feaver, public opinion professor.

But, according to reports, the Annapolis speech and 35-page Web document are largely the work of Feaver, a political scientist at Duke whose expertise is in public opinion, not military strategy or national security. Feaver started doing work for the White House earlier this year after he and Duke colleagues released polling data suggesting new ways for winning public support for the war.

"This is not really a strategy document from the Pentagon about fighting the insurgency," Christopher Gelpi, the Duke co-author of Feaver's research on American tolerance for war casualties, told the New York Times. "The Pentagon doesn't need the president to give a speech and post a document on the White House Web site to know how to fight the insurgents. The document is clearly targeted at American public opinion."

John Mueller, a political scientist at Ohio State University, told the New York Times he doesn't think the president's new strategy - which he described as "very Feaverish, or Feaveresque" - will produce more than short-term improvement in public support for the war. But Mueller and others noted that the rhetoric (the president used the word "victory" 15 times in the Annapolis speech) fits Feaver's theory that the public will support relatively heavy U.S. casualties in a war that is perceived as winnable.

For someone who often claims not to care about public opinion, the president has been in a frenzy of Iraq speechifying ever since Rep. John Murtha, D-Pa., publicly turned against the war last month.

The president and his inner circle had no problem demonizing Michael Moore, Howard Dean or even Cindy Sheehan when they were the most prominent faces of antiwar sentiment. Even many of the administration's own generals and policymakers have been effectively marginalized after voicing internal criticism of war strategy.

But the White House hasn't figured out what to do with Murtha, a burly, straight-talking 37-year Marine and Vietnam veteran with close ties to the Pentagon.

First, they foolishly tried to give Murtha the Michael Moore treatment. They sent out White House spokesman Scott McClellan to say he found it "baffling that (Murtha) is endorsing the policy positions of Michael Moore and the extreme liberal wing of the Democratic Party." When that didn't work, they brought Vice President Dick Cheney out of his secret lair to lead the trashing of Murtha.

"I like guys who've never been there who criticize us who've been there," Murtha said of Cheney. "I like that. I like guys who got five deferments and never been there and sent people to war and then don't like to hear suggestions (about) what may need to be done."

That caused Cheney to back off a bit, calling Murtha "a good man, a Marine, a patriot" who is nevertheless engaged in a "dangerous illusion" about Iraq. And Cheney knows a dangerous illusion about Iraq when he sees one.

But the most despicable slander of Murtha came from freshman U.S. Rep. Jean Schmidt, R-Ohio, who claimed during a November House debate that a Marine in Iraq had asked her to send a message to Murtha: "Cowards cut and run; Marines never do." That outburst provoked several courageous Democrats to rush to the well of the House to denounce Schmidt. Then they went back to hiding behind Murtha's coattails.

While the Bush administration is still scrambling to develop one Iraq strategy, congressional Democrats still have at least three. Murtha wants to pull back our combat troops to secure positions within six months. Sen. Joseph Lieberman, D-Conn., is even more hawkish than Cheney. And Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., still feels strongly both ways.

It's a reflection of how far this country has run off the rails that, in an August special election, the presumably sane voters of Ohio's 2nd congressional district chose a unprincipled wackjob like Schmidt over Democrat Paul Hackett, a smart and telegenic (if slightly too glib) Iraq veteran who talked more sense on the war than any sitting member of Congress. It was like choosing Cloris Leachman's Frau Blucher over Jimmy Stewart's Mr. Smith.
Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 02:22
bien acompañado
Explanation:
bien acompañado
Selected response from:

Susy Ordaz
Local time: 07:22
Grading comment
gracias

Mike :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4bien acompañado
Susy Ordaz
4 +4está en buena compañía
posada
4 +1codearse con los meros meros (México)xxxOso
4no le va en zaga
Mauricio López Langenbach
4justo en el lugar que le corresponde
Joanna Drzewieniecki
3 +1no tiene nada que enviadiar(les) / no se queda atrás
MitsukoD
4justo en el lugar que le corresponde
Joanna Drzewieniecki
3codeandose con la crema y nata.connyfernandez


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
bien acompañado


Explanation:
bien acompañado

Susy Ordaz
Local time: 07:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
gracias

Mike :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yaotl Altan: sublime definición
1 min
  -> Gracias Yaotl y Feliz Navidad!

agree  Chelin:
3 hrs

agree  marox79: Simple y llanamente
15 hrs

agree  Marina56: OK
16 hrs
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
justo en el lugar que le corresponde


Explanation:
Creo que pega muy bien en este contexto. No sé que les parece

Irene

Joanna Drzewieniecki
Local time: 01:22
Native speaker of: English
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
justo en el lugar que le corresponde


Explanation:
Me parece que cae bien en este contexto.

Irene

Joanna Drzewieniecki
Local time: 01:22
Native speaker of: English
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
codearse con los meros meros (México)


Explanation:
Hola Mike,
Según tu definición: "be in the same situation as someone important or respected." esta podría ser una opción.

Lo de los "meros meros" o "el mero mero" o "la mera mera" etc. se usa mucho en México coloquialmente para hacer alusión a alguien importante o respetado.
Buena suerte y saludos del Oso ¶:^)

codearse.
4. prnl. Dicho de una persona: Tener trato habitual, **de igual a igual**, con otra o con cierto grupo social.
DRAE©

el mero mero. m. El más importante (con sentido ponderativo), el jefe, la persona principal.
(Diccionario de Mexicanismos)
academia.org.mx


xxxOso
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 136

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marina Soldati: Si, lo de codearse se usa también en Argentina, pero "meros meros" nunca lo había escuchado. Saludos Oso
2 hrs
  -> ¡Saludos, Marina! Muchas gracias por el dato de Argentina y por tu agrí ¶:^)

neutral  Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT: ¡Claro que no la invalida! Era sólo una nota como info. ¡Un saludo! >Sólo una nota regional. En España "mero" no tiene el significado que en México. En los primeros instantes, "codearse con los meros meros" lo entenderíamos como "tener amistad ...
8 hrs
  -> Claro, por eso indiqué "México". Ya que Mike pidió específicamente "Please give answers that are more creative than 'en buena compañía'" creí interesante ofrecer lo que usamos en mi país. No creo que, en este caso, un regionalismo invalide a otro.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
está en buena compañía


Explanation:
Colombia

posada
Local time: 01:22
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MitsukoD
36 mins

agree  Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT: Sí. En España sería también válido.
6 hrs

agree  GemaBCN
13 hrs

agree  Scheherezade Suria Lopez
16 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
no tiene nada que enviadiar(les) / no se queda atrás


Explanation:
Creo que "estar en buena compañía" es una excelente interpretación, generalmente hablando.
Pero en este texto en particular quizá sirvan las que te propongo: "Así que Bush no tiene nada que envidiarles" o: "De modo que Bush no se queda atrás", en el sentido de que puede ser tan torpe o ridículo como los ejemplos citados.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 33 mins (2005-12-16 00:33:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Perdón por el error: "envidiar"

MitsukoD
Local time: 03:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  marox79: Me gusta, para una interpretación no tan general.
12 hrs
  -> Gracias, Marox
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
no le va en zaga


Explanation:
"Bush no le va en zaga a los demás". Same idea as "no se queda atrás".

Mauricio López Langenbach
New Zealand
Local time: 18:22
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
codeandose con la crema y nata.


Explanation:
Friendly with the best of the best.
They say in Spanish that the cream raises to the surface.(Talking about milk.)so crema y nata are the best of the best.

connyfernandez
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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