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advertorial use

Spanish translation: uso ilustrativo

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:advertorial use
Spanish translation:uso ilustrativo
Entered by: Maria
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

19:25 Jan 11, 2002
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Law/Patents / Intellectual Property Guidelines
English term or phrase: advertorial use
"Advertorial use" is an industry term. Legally and technically, an advertorial use is an editorial use. The image is used to illustrate an article in a magazine, and not for advertising of a specific product or service. An advertorial use must meet the editorial use requirements, or it will be considered a comercial use."

Any idea how to translate advertorial? And it cannot be "publicitario" because that terms refers to something different.

Gracias anticipadas. ;o)
Maria
Local time: 18:07
advertorial
Explanation:
The seems to be no Spanish word for this term. Some websites define it with "paid for editorials", but it is much more. A magazine publishes a special edition on - lets say - sailing boats, and writes and reports about that specific product, mentions shipbuilders and interviews them. The help pay for the publication.

See following excplaniation and link:
____________________________________
 advertising banners
 web site sponsorships
 newsletter & ezine advertising
 opt-in emails
 online incentive programs (sweepstakes, contests, & rewards)
 "advertorial" (paid-for editorial) placements
We will also audit your campaign to assure the delivery of your placement and will analyze the results of each campaign, as it pertains both from traffic and transaction.
________________

SPONSOR vs. PATROCINADOR ?
HAS TIME TO COME FOR A UNIFIED GLOSSARY ?

Ignasi B. Vendrell
Head of the Global Technology Division
EDELMAN Public Relations Worldwide


This article highlights issues concerning public relations terminology now facing Spanish-speaking practitioners. The Spanish-language is co-opting equivalent words to describe Anglo-Saxon public relations concepts. Still some of the terms are being directly translated while others are adopting the English word. A terminological interpretation offers the best solution to achieve a unified Spanish public relations glossary.

Are Spanish-speaking public relations practitioners going to directly translate the word "grassroots" or are they going to adopt the English word as valid? Why are South and Central America, Mexico and Spain using the word "lobby" instead of "lobbying" to describe the lobbyists' art? Why are Spanish-speaking professionals using the English word "sponsorship" when the Spanish term patrocinar means the same?

The Spanish-language still does not have a translation for 60 commonly used public relations terms which are being used by English-speaking public relations professionals. For example, publicity, issues management, focus group, video news release (VNR), gatekeeper, stakeholder, fact sheet, fundraising, hotline or media advisory, leaving the Spaniard journalist, Pedro Sorela , to comment (El Pais Newspaper. Madrid, September 20, 1993): "The Spanish-language is not evolving as quickly as the science."

The Spanish-language is unable to translate new technical-scientific terminology. Public relations practitioners need to become aware of this problem and find solutions to build a strong body of theoretical and practical knowledge in our field.

While the first public relations firm and curricula were created in the U. S. 90 years ago, they had existed in Spain for only 25 years. While Spanish-speaking countries have experienced enormous growth in public relations during this time, a unique public relations language common Spanish Glossary to all Hispanics from the United States, Mexico, Central America, South America and Spain has yet to emerge.

Approximately 25 million Latinos live in the United States (a number equal to the population of Colombia or eight times the Uruguayan population). The growth of the Hispanic community is expected to exceed all other populations during the next 50 years, making minority communication specialties such as Hispanic Public Relations increasingly important to U.S. corporations. Decisions are being made in the U.S. by Latino-practitioners that will deeply affect the future of other Spanish-speaking professionals.


OBSERVATIONS OF CURRENT PHENOMENA AND PROBLEMS IN THE SPANISH-SPEAKING PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMUNITY

Not having a common terminology will negatively affect both the Spanish-language and the profession. Currently, Spanish-speaking public relations professionals are adopting English-terminology in an inconsistent manner. For instance, the verb, "lobby" is used as a noun, when "lobbying" is the correct English term. But, they use the word marketing in its correct form.

Solving the problem by direct translation doesn't help either, in some cases words for concepts don't exist. In other cases, a direct translation into Spanish, without interpretation could create a problem. For instance, "hotline" could be directly translated as linea caliente or "sex phone line." An appropriate interpretation of the same word will result as linea telefonica de informacion gratuita 24 horas al dia or informational 24 hour telephone line.

The profession is also negatively affected. On one hand, Spanish-speaking countries' integration into the public relations world could be postponed. For instance, not having up-to-date terminology will cause language distance and undefinition among Anglo and Hispanic practitioners. On the other hand, bilingual U.S. Latino-practitioners will enormously influence Spanish vocabulary. For example, Mass media is now translated as medios masivos instead of medios de comunicacion de masas.

Coming to a consensus about a Spanish public relations language at this point in time will benefit our field in the following ways:


The Spanish-language: the practitioners could recommend the use of the new terminology. National language institutions would possibly agree with the recommended new vocabulary and dictionaries will incorporate the submitted and approved terminology.

The public relations profession: having a public relations glossary will allow practitioners to define by themselves the limits and extents of the profession, avoiding influence from the fields of marketing, advertising, promotion and sales.

Professionalism: language confusion would be avoided with the provision of new vocabulary that links the languages of the world.

Students: The insertion of the new vocabulary in textbooks and university curricula will increase the spread of the new terms.

Alternatives:
Three feasible alternatives to address this problem must be considered:


Adoption of Anglo words.
This alternative means the English term is used as a Spanish word. It is best suited for words that lack a direct translation, since it insures preservation of logical meaning and conceptual meaning. For instance, if the word "grassroots" were directly translated as hierba (grass) and raices (roots), it will lose completely its meaning. While opponents fear that the addition of too many foreign language words will damage the Spanish-language, this is the easiest option to follow.


Direct translation into the Spanish-language.
For some words direct translation from English improves the Spanish concept already in use. For example, the word "clipping" that includes press clips, radio clips and TV clips could be translated as clipear. The current Spanish term recorte de prensa refers only to clips from press, forgetting Spanish radio and TV.


Terminological interpretation.
This alternative means taking an English word and grasping an understanding of it in its socio-economic-cultural context. Then interpreting the meaning of the same word within the context of Hispanic culture, thus creating a new Spanish word, whose meaning will be equal to the original English word. For instance, the idea of cause related marketing could be interpreted as buena causa relacionada con la mercadotecnia or la mercadotecnia pro buena causa.


For the purpose of preventing future confusion among Spanish-speaking practitioners, we should face the terminology problem now. Of all alternatives presented, the terminological interpretation alternative is the most appropriate. However, we should sometimes consider direct translation into the Spanish-language and the adoption of Anglo words for specific cases. To develop the alternatives, it is recommended that qualitative and quantitative research be conducted to analyze the best word-choice and the results submitted to the practitioners for consensus.
In order to implement this proposal, an Anglo-Spanish terminology committee composed of public relations professors and practitioners, should be created at once. Decisions made by the committee should be submitted for approval to Spanish-speaking public relations associations. The new Spanish Glossary vocabulary should be submitted for inclusion into language institutions in Spanish-speaking countries, so that country can implement its study and propel its inclusion in dictionaries.

In April 1994, the III World Public Relations Professors Congress held in Punta del Este (Uruguay) accepted the lecture "Moving Toward a Spanish Etymological Adaptation of the English Public Relations Vocabulary," becoming the first research sponsored by the Inter-American Confederation of Public Relations Professional Associations (CONFIARP). The two primary phases of the project have been managed from the U. S. and the third part will be implemented from Equator, as a thesis of the graduate student of the Equinoctial Technological University (UTE), David Davalos.

The two primary phases of the research were conducted among the Hispanic Public Relations Association's (HPRA) members and listed 60 English words without an adapted translation into the Spanish-language. In the United States, the research has been sponsored by the U. S. Hispanic Public Relations Association based in Los Angeles, and the Hispanic public relations firm Valencia, Maldonado & Echeveste (VME) in Pasadena, CA.

According to HPRA President Octavio Nuiry, "Hispanic public relations grew up unexpectedly during the past ten years. For this reason, we decided to sponsor this project from the beginning because we believe that it will contribute to a better definition of our profession in the U.S. and in all Spanish Glossary Spanish-speaking countries, as well."

In conclusion, I refer to the reflections of the Spanish journalist, Pedro Sorela (El Pais Newspaper. Madrid, September 20, 1993): "The Spanish language is like an old aristocrat, rich for so long that he doesn't know how to measure his fortune and is unable to understand new languages."


LIST OF ENGLISH TERMS TO BE ADAPTED


A-Roll
Advertorial
Advertiser
Advertising
Advocacy
B-Roll
Benchmark Study
Boundary Spanning
Brochure
Canvassing
Capital Campaign
Cause Related Marketing
Chayron
Clipping
Coalition Building
Constituencies
Corporate Advertising
Corporate Social Responsibility
Counselor on PR
Dispute Resolution
Dominant Coalition
Embargo
Endowment
Environmental Analysis
Environmental Scanning
Environmental Monitoring
Environmental Forecasting
Environmental Issues Assessment
Facilitator Role
Fact-Sheet
Focus Group
Fundraising
Grassroots
Gross Impressions
Hotline
Issues Management
Lapsed Donor
Lobbying
Nonpublic
Major Donors
Major Gifts Campaign
Marketing Communications
Media
Media Advisory
Newsletter
News release
Organizational Communication
PAC (Political Action Committee)
Pledge Program
Prioritizing Issues
PSA (Public Service Announcement)
Publicity
Press Kit
Radio News Release (RNR)
Scanning Research
Sponsor
Stakeholder
Talk Show
Target Group
Telephone Tree
Telethon
Video News Release (VNR)







Selected response from:

Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 01:07
Grading comment
Wow, Maya, very impressive! Given the fact that this term is still "pending" better definition, and given the context of my document, I decided to translate it as "uso ilustrativo" because it refers to the use of a photograph as an illustration, without publicity or advertsiment purposes, simple to illustrate a page. ;o) hence, I created a term that goes well with my context.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4de referencia
Rick Henry
4advertorial
Maya Jurt
4used as a reference
Roberto Cavalcanti
4avisotorialFuad Yahya
4An advertisement
Kim Metzger


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
An advertisement


Explanation:
Maria, I think you probably wanted to post this in the English to Spanish category, but in any case here's a dictionary definition: an advertisement offering information about a commercial or industrial product or activity in the style of an editorial comment.


    The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary
Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 18:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 91
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
avisotorial


Explanation:
The term "advertorial" is a combination of "advertisement" and "editorial," just as "infomercial" is a combination of "informational" and "commercial."

You can similarly coin a Spanish term by combining "aviso" and "editorial." I suggest "avisotorial."

Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
used as a reference


Explanation:
the verb advert means to reference

Roberto Cavalcanti
Brazil
Local time: 22:07
Native speaker of: Portuguese
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
advertorial


Explanation:
The seems to be no Spanish word for this term. Some websites define it with "paid for editorials", but it is much more. A magazine publishes a special edition on - lets say - sailing boats, and writes and reports about that specific product, mentions shipbuilders and interviews them. The help pay for the publication.

See following excplaniation and link:
____________________________________
 advertising banners
 web site sponsorships
 newsletter & ezine advertising
 opt-in emails
 online incentive programs (sweepstakes, contests, & rewards)
 "advertorial" (paid-for editorial) placements
We will also audit your campaign to assure the delivery of your placement and will analyze the results of each campaign, as it pertains both from traffic and transaction.
________________

SPONSOR vs. PATROCINADOR ?
HAS TIME TO COME FOR A UNIFIED GLOSSARY ?

Ignasi B. Vendrell
Head of the Global Technology Division
EDELMAN Public Relations Worldwide


This article highlights issues concerning public relations terminology now facing Spanish-speaking practitioners. The Spanish-language is co-opting equivalent words to describe Anglo-Saxon public relations concepts. Still some of the terms are being directly translated while others are adopting the English word. A terminological interpretation offers the best solution to achieve a unified Spanish public relations glossary.

Are Spanish-speaking public relations practitioners going to directly translate the word "grassroots" or are they going to adopt the English word as valid? Why are South and Central America, Mexico and Spain using the word "lobby" instead of "lobbying" to describe the lobbyists' art? Why are Spanish-speaking professionals using the English word "sponsorship" when the Spanish term patrocinar means the same?

The Spanish-language still does not have a translation for 60 commonly used public relations terms which are being used by English-speaking public relations professionals. For example, publicity, issues management, focus group, video news release (VNR), gatekeeper, stakeholder, fact sheet, fundraising, hotline or media advisory, leaving the Spaniard journalist, Pedro Sorela , to comment (El Pais Newspaper. Madrid, September 20, 1993): "The Spanish-language is not evolving as quickly as the science."

The Spanish-language is unable to translate new technical-scientific terminology. Public relations practitioners need to become aware of this problem and find solutions to build a strong body of theoretical and practical knowledge in our field.

While the first public relations firm and curricula were created in the U. S. 90 years ago, they had existed in Spain for only 25 years. While Spanish-speaking countries have experienced enormous growth in public relations during this time, a unique public relations language common Spanish Glossary to all Hispanics from the United States, Mexico, Central America, South America and Spain has yet to emerge.

Approximately 25 million Latinos live in the United States (a number equal to the population of Colombia or eight times the Uruguayan population). The growth of the Hispanic community is expected to exceed all other populations during the next 50 years, making minority communication specialties such as Hispanic Public Relations increasingly important to U.S. corporations. Decisions are being made in the U.S. by Latino-practitioners that will deeply affect the future of other Spanish-speaking professionals.


OBSERVATIONS OF CURRENT PHENOMENA AND PROBLEMS IN THE SPANISH-SPEAKING PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMUNITY

Not having a common terminology will negatively affect both the Spanish-language and the profession. Currently, Spanish-speaking public relations professionals are adopting English-terminology in an inconsistent manner. For instance, the verb, "lobby" is used as a noun, when "lobbying" is the correct English term. But, they use the word marketing in its correct form.

Solving the problem by direct translation doesn't help either, in some cases words for concepts don't exist. In other cases, a direct translation into Spanish, without interpretation could create a problem. For instance, "hotline" could be directly translated as linea caliente or "sex phone line." An appropriate interpretation of the same word will result as linea telefonica de informacion gratuita 24 horas al dia or informational 24 hour telephone line.

The profession is also negatively affected. On one hand, Spanish-speaking countries' integration into the public relations world could be postponed. For instance, not having up-to-date terminology will cause language distance and undefinition among Anglo and Hispanic practitioners. On the other hand, bilingual U.S. Latino-practitioners will enormously influence Spanish vocabulary. For example, Mass media is now translated as medios masivos instead of medios de comunicacion de masas.

Coming to a consensus about a Spanish public relations language at this point in time will benefit our field in the following ways:


The Spanish-language: the practitioners could recommend the use of the new terminology. National language institutions would possibly agree with the recommended new vocabulary and dictionaries will incorporate the submitted and approved terminology.

The public relations profession: having a public relations glossary will allow practitioners to define by themselves the limits and extents of the profession, avoiding influence from the fields of marketing, advertising, promotion and sales.

Professionalism: language confusion would be avoided with the provision of new vocabulary that links the languages of the world.

Students: The insertion of the new vocabulary in textbooks and university curricula will increase the spread of the new terms.

Alternatives:
Three feasible alternatives to address this problem must be considered:


Adoption of Anglo words.
This alternative means the English term is used as a Spanish word. It is best suited for words that lack a direct translation, since it insures preservation of logical meaning and conceptual meaning. For instance, if the word "grassroots" were directly translated as hierba (grass) and raices (roots), it will lose completely its meaning. While opponents fear that the addition of too many foreign language words will damage the Spanish-language, this is the easiest option to follow.


Direct translation into the Spanish-language.
For some words direct translation from English improves the Spanish concept already in use. For example, the word "clipping" that includes press clips, radio clips and TV clips could be translated as clipear. The current Spanish term recorte de prensa refers only to clips from press, forgetting Spanish radio and TV.


Terminological interpretation.
This alternative means taking an English word and grasping an understanding of it in its socio-economic-cultural context. Then interpreting the meaning of the same word within the context of Hispanic culture, thus creating a new Spanish word, whose meaning will be equal to the original English word. For instance, the idea of cause related marketing could be interpreted as buena causa relacionada con la mercadotecnia or la mercadotecnia pro buena causa.


For the purpose of preventing future confusion among Spanish-speaking practitioners, we should face the terminology problem now. Of all alternatives presented, the terminological interpretation alternative is the most appropriate. However, we should sometimes consider direct translation into the Spanish-language and the adoption of Anglo words for specific cases. To develop the alternatives, it is recommended that qualitative and quantitative research be conducted to analyze the best word-choice and the results submitted to the practitioners for consensus.
In order to implement this proposal, an Anglo-Spanish terminology committee composed of public relations professors and practitioners, should be created at once. Decisions made by the committee should be submitted for approval to Spanish-speaking public relations associations. The new Spanish Glossary vocabulary should be submitted for inclusion into language institutions in Spanish-speaking countries, so that country can implement its study and propel its inclusion in dictionaries.

In April 1994, the III World Public Relations Professors Congress held in Punta del Este (Uruguay) accepted the lecture "Moving Toward a Spanish Etymological Adaptation of the English Public Relations Vocabulary," becoming the first research sponsored by the Inter-American Confederation of Public Relations Professional Associations (CONFIARP). The two primary phases of the project have been managed from the U. S. and the third part will be implemented from Equator, as a thesis of the graduate student of the Equinoctial Technological University (UTE), David Davalos.

The two primary phases of the research were conducted among the Hispanic Public Relations Association's (HPRA) members and listed 60 English words without an adapted translation into the Spanish-language. In the United States, the research has been sponsored by the U. S. Hispanic Public Relations Association based in Los Angeles, and the Hispanic public relations firm Valencia, Maldonado & Echeveste (VME) in Pasadena, CA.

According to HPRA President Octavio Nuiry, "Hispanic public relations grew up unexpectedly during the past ten years. For this reason, we decided to sponsor this project from the beginning because we believe that it will contribute to a better definition of our profession in the U.S. and in all Spanish Glossary Spanish-speaking countries, as well."

In conclusion, I refer to the reflections of the Spanish journalist, Pedro Sorela (El Pais Newspaper. Madrid, September 20, 1993): "The Spanish language is like an old aristocrat, rich for so long that he doesn't know how to measure his fortune and is unable to understand new languages."


LIST OF ENGLISH TERMS TO BE ADAPTED


A-Roll
Advertorial
Advertiser
Advertising
Advocacy
B-Roll
Benchmark Study
Boundary Spanning
Brochure
Canvassing
Capital Campaign
Cause Related Marketing
Chayron
Clipping
Coalition Building
Constituencies
Corporate Advertising
Corporate Social Responsibility
Counselor on PR
Dispute Resolution
Dominant Coalition
Embargo
Endowment
Environmental Analysis
Environmental Scanning
Environmental Monitoring
Environmental Forecasting
Environmental Issues Assessment
Facilitator Role
Fact-Sheet
Focus Group
Fundraising
Grassroots
Gross Impressions
Hotline
Issues Management
Lapsed Donor
Lobbying
Nonpublic
Major Donors
Major Gifts Campaign
Marketing Communications
Media
Media Advisory
Newsletter
News release
Organizational Communication
PAC (Political Action Committee)
Pledge Program
Prioritizing Issues
PSA (Public Service Announcement)
Publicity
Press Kit
Radio News Release (RNR)
Scanning Research
Sponsor
Stakeholder
Talk Show
Target Group
Telephone Tree
Telethon
Video News Release (VNR)










    Reference: http://www.orbicom.uqam.ca/en/papers/vendrell.html
Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 01:07
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Wow, Maya, very impressive! Given the fact that this term is still "pending" better definition, and given the context of my document, I decided to translate it as "uso ilustrativo" because it refers to the use of a photograph as an illustration, without publicity or advertsiment purposes, simple to illustrate a page. ;o) hence, I created a term that goes well with my context.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
de referencia


Explanation:
HTH

Rick

Rick Henry
United States
Local time: 18:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 291
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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