pin bones

Spanish translation: tuberosidades isquiáticas (puntas de nalgas)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pin bones
Spanish translation:tuberosidades isquiáticas (puntas de nalgas)
Entered by: Charles Davis
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11:03 May 14, 2018
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Livestock / Animal Husbandry / equinos
English term or phrase: pin bones
Contexto: Hip bones visible and felt easily (hock and pin bones).
Bárbara Hammerle López-Francos
Spain
Local time: 02:07
tuberosidades isquiáticas (puntas de nalgas)
Explanation:
Hay dos candidatos: la tuberosidad coxal (la punta delantera de la cadera del caballo, que se llama comúnmente punta del anca), y la tuberosidad isquiática (la punta trasera, llamada comúnmente la punta de nalga). ¿Cuál es?

En bovinos, el "pin bone" es la segunda, y la primera se llama "hook bone":

"13. Tuber coxae = hook bone (common name)
14. Tuber ischia = pin bone (common name)"
https://books.google.es/books?id=lhknDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA251&lpg=P...

¿Es así en equinos? La siguiente fuente identifica el "pin bone" en caballos con la otra tuberosidad, la coxal:

"tuber coxae or pin bone"
https://books.google.es/books?id=bpIQIZ56hxYC&pg=PA30&lpg=PA...

Sin embargo, las otras fuentes consultadas dicen lo contrario e identifican el "pin bone" en equinos con la tuberosidad isquiática:

Ver aquí el dibujo en pág. 4:
https://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex9622/$FILE/bcs-horse.pdf

Y luego la siguiente página también indica que debe de ser la tuberosidad isquiática, porque dice que una línea vertical desde el "pin bone" debe tocar la punta del corvejón, mirando desde el lado, y eso es imposible si el "pin bone" es la tuberosidad coxal:

"When examined from behind the normal conformation of the hindlimb should show the pin bone, hock and centre of the foot to be in a perpendicular line. When viewed from the side, a perpendicular line from the pin bone should touch the point of the hock at the back and be parallel to the hind cannon to the ground."
http://meandervets.com.au/AnimalCare/Articles/ArticleDetails...

Por tanto, creo que se trata de la tuberosidad isquiática, que se llama a veces punta de nalga:

"Región del tronco [...]
Su largo se mide desde el punto medio del encuentro (articulación escápulo-humeral) hasta la punta de nalga (tuberosidad isquiática)"
http://docplayer.es/46978199-Exterior-del-caballo.html

"Amplitud de puntas de nalgas (puntas de isqueos)"
http://www.ekus506.com/caballoibero.com/index.php/es/articul...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2018-05-14 16:26:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Bárbara: Yo creo que sí. Saludos.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 02:07
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2tuberosidades isquiáticas (puntas de nalgas)
Charles Davis
Summary of reference entries provided
Comment
Taña Dalglish

Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tuberosidades isquiáticas (puntas de nalgas)


Explanation:
Hay dos candidatos: la tuberosidad coxal (la punta delantera de la cadera del caballo, que se llama comúnmente punta del anca), y la tuberosidad isquiática (la punta trasera, llamada comúnmente la punta de nalga). ¿Cuál es?

En bovinos, el "pin bone" es la segunda, y la primera se llama "hook bone":

"13. Tuber coxae = hook bone (common name)
14. Tuber ischia = pin bone (common name)"
https://books.google.es/books?id=lhknDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA251&lpg=P...

¿Es así en equinos? La siguiente fuente identifica el "pin bone" en caballos con la otra tuberosidad, la coxal:

"tuber coxae or pin bone"
https://books.google.es/books?id=bpIQIZ56hxYC&pg=PA30&lpg=PA...

Sin embargo, las otras fuentes consultadas dicen lo contrario e identifican el "pin bone" en equinos con la tuberosidad isquiática:

Ver aquí el dibujo en pág. 4:
https://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex9622/$FILE/bcs-horse.pdf

Y luego la siguiente página también indica que debe de ser la tuberosidad isquiática, porque dice que una línea vertical desde el "pin bone" debe tocar la punta del corvejón, mirando desde el lado, y eso es imposible si el "pin bone" es la tuberosidad coxal:

"When examined from behind the normal conformation of the hindlimb should show the pin bone, hock and centre of the foot to be in a perpendicular line. When viewed from the side, a perpendicular line from the pin bone should touch the point of the hock at the back and be parallel to the hind cannon to the ground."
http://meandervets.com.au/AnimalCare/Articles/ArticleDetails...

Por tanto, creo que se trata de la tuberosidad isquiática, que se llama a veces punta de nalga:

"Región del tronco [...]
Su largo se mide desde el punto medio del encuentro (articulación escápulo-humeral) hasta la punta de nalga (tuberosidad isquiática)"
http://docplayer.es/46978199-Exterior-del-caballo.html

"Amplitud de puntas de nalgas (puntas de isqueos)"
http://www.ekus506.com/caballoibero.com/index.php/es/articul...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2018-05-14 16:26:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Bárbara: Yo creo que sí. Saludos.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 02:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44
Notes to answerer
Asker: ¡Muchas gracias, Charles! Visto lo visto, "hook and pin bones" podría ser "tuberosidades coxales e isquiáticas".


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Taña Dalglish: Great research as always. The text is a tad strange, and I wonder whether "hock" should be "hook" in Asker's text? "Hock" does exist but it is lower down, e.g point of hock and that too is a protrusion.
23 mins
  -> Thanks, Taña :-) You're probably right; hook makes more sense, since it's also a hip bone.

agree  JohnMcDove: By hook or by crook... No, en realidad, a base de pura lógica cartesiana, o lógica CharlesDavesiana... ;-)
2 hrs
  -> No por conocimientos equinos, desde luego. Me suena que comen paja... Gracias, John ;-)
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Reference comments


2 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: Comment

Reference information:
Charles/Bárbara:
https://wtamu-ir.tdl.org/wtamu-ir/bitstream/handle/11310/109...
1-Poor. Animal is extremely emaciated. Spinous processes (dorsal portion of the
vertebra), ribs, tailhead, and bony protrusions of the ***pelvic girdle (hooks and pins)*** are prominent. Bone structure of withers, shoulders, and neck are easily noticeable. No fatty tissues can be felt.

Bárbara, you may wish to double check your text with your client. IMO, I think it should be "hook" and not "hock". The term "hock" does exist, but that is a lower protrusion of the hind legs.

Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52
Note to reference poster
Asker: That is a very good observation. Thanks a lot, Taña! As you say, "hock" is a lower protrusión of the hind legs, what we call "corvejón", and this does not make sense in the context of the hip bones.


Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  JohnMcDove
1 hr
  -> Muchas gracias John.
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